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Adaptive pressure support servoventilation: a novel treatment for residual sleepiness associated with central sleep apnea events.
Sleep Breath. 2011 Dec; 15(4):695-9.SB

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) usually reduces sleepiness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). However, even with regular use of nCPAP, some OSAHS patients experience residual sleepiness (RS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adaptive servoventilation (ASV) on RS in OSAHS patients.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score was used for assessment of RS. Following correct application of 1-month auto-CPAP (APAP) treatment and exclusion for other sleepiness-associated disorders, 42 RS patients with severe OSAS were recruited. All of them received 1-week ASV treatment with auto-CS2 ventilator. Comparisons between APAP and ASV treatments were made for the following data: polysomnographic parameters including apnea hypopnea index (AHI), central sleep apnea index (CSAI), micro-arousal index (MAI), minimal pulse oxygen saturation, etc.; daytime ESS score.

RESULTS

Compared with the parameters on day 30 of APAP treatment, there was a further significant decrease in AHI, CSAI, MAI, and daytime ESS score (P < 0.01) on day 7 of ASV treatment. ESS score before ASV treatment (10.89 ± 0.40) reduced to normal range (3.98 ± 1.26) on day 7 of ASV treatment (P < 0.01).

CONCLUSION

ASV treatment could significantly improved RS in OSAS patients; the mechanism of such an efficacy might be associated with further declined levels of AHI, CSAI, and arousal index.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing 210029, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20862555

Citation

Su, Mei, et al. "Adaptive Pressure Support Servoventilation: a Novel Treatment for Residual Sleepiness Associated With Central Sleep Apnea Events." Sleep & Breathing = Schlaf & Atmung, vol. 15, no. 4, 2011, pp. 695-9.
Su M, Zhang X, Huang M, et al. Adaptive pressure support servoventilation: a novel treatment for residual sleepiness associated with central sleep apnea events. Sleep Breath. 2011;15(4):695-9.
Su, M., Zhang, X., Huang, M., & Ding, N. (2011). Adaptive pressure support servoventilation: a novel treatment for residual sleepiness associated with central sleep apnea events. Sleep & Breathing = Schlaf & Atmung, 15(4), 695-9. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11325-010-0424-6
Su M, et al. Adaptive Pressure Support Servoventilation: a Novel Treatment for Residual Sleepiness Associated With Central Sleep Apnea Events. Sleep Breath. 2011;15(4):695-9. PubMed PMID: 20862555.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adaptive pressure support servoventilation: a novel treatment for residual sleepiness associated with central sleep apnea events. AU - Su,Mei, AU - Zhang,Xilong, AU - Huang,Mao, AU - Ding,Ning, Y1 - 2010/09/23/ PY - 2010/03/03/received PY - 2010/08/23/accepted PY - 2010/07/20/revised PY - 2010/9/24/entrez PY - 2010/9/24/pubmed PY - 2012/4/5/medline SP - 695 EP - 9 JF - Sleep & breathing = Schlaf & Atmung JO - Sleep Breath VL - 15 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) usually reduces sleepiness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). However, even with regular use of nCPAP, some OSAHS patients experience residual sleepiness (RS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adaptive servoventilation (ASV) on RS in OSAHS patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score was used for assessment of RS. Following correct application of 1-month auto-CPAP (APAP) treatment and exclusion for other sleepiness-associated disorders, 42 RS patients with severe OSAS were recruited. All of them received 1-week ASV treatment with auto-CS2 ventilator. Comparisons between APAP and ASV treatments were made for the following data: polysomnographic parameters including apnea hypopnea index (AHI), central sleep apnea index (CSAI), micro-arousal index (MAI), minimal pulse oxygen saturation, etc.; daytime ESS score. RESULTS: Compared with the parameters on day 30 of APAP treatment, there was a further significant decrease in AHI, CSAI, MAI, and daytime ESS score (P < 0.01) on day 7 of ASV treatment. ESS score before ASV treatment (10.89 ± 0.40) reduced to normal range (3.98 ± 1.26) on day 7 of ASV treatment (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: ASV treatment could significantly improved RS in OSAS patients; the mechanism of such an efficacy might be associated with further declined levels of AHI, CSAI, and arousal index. SN - 1522-1709 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20862555/Adaptive_pressure_support_servoventilation:_a_novel_treatment_for_residual_sleepiness_associated_with_central_sleep_apnea_events_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11325-010-0424-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -