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Current US military operations and implications for military surgical training.
J Am Coll Surg. 2010 Nov; 211(5):658-62.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Since 2001, US military surgeons have deployed frequently, with many surgeons deploying within 1 year of graduating residency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate readiness of recent graduates to manage combat-related injuries and to make recommendations for improvements in training military surgeons.

STUDY DESIGN

We reviewed casualties treated at the 31st Combat Support Hospital in Baghdad from December 2003 to November 2004. We identified 3,426 wounded patients; of these, 2,648 (77.3%) required an operative procedure. There were 2,788 patients (81.4%) who sustained penetrating injuries. The most common procedures performed were debridement of wounds (39%), skeletal fixation (14.7%), and exploratory laparotomy (11.4%). Common procedures were compared with 15 case logs from the ACGME database for our institution from 2005 to 2009.

RESULTS

Graduating residents averaged 973 cases during residency (range 867 to 1,293, median 921). This included experience with most procedures encountered except nephrectomy (1.5 procedures per resident [PPR]), craniotomy (1.1 PPRs), inferior vena cava injury (1.1 PPRs), bladder repair (0.87 PPR), and duodenal injury (0.6 PPR). Residents had minimal experience with skeletal fixation and external genital trauma.

CONCLUSIONS

Recent surgical residency graduates are prepared for deployment in support of US military operations for the majority of injuries encountered. However, familiarization with procedures that fall outside the traditional general surgical curriculum would improve their ability to treat these injuries. To enhance experience with rare injuries, cadaver studies and animal models may serve as training tools before deployment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Surgery, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, TX 78234, USA. Josh.Tyler@amedd.army.milNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20869271

Citation

Tyler, Joshua A., et al. "Current US Military Operations and Implications for Military Surgical Training." Journal of the American College of Surgeons, vol. 211, no. 5, 2010, pp. 658-62.
Tyler JA, Clive KS, White CE, et al. Current US military operations and implications for military surgical training. J Am Coll Surg. 2010;211(5):658-62.
Tyler, J. A., Clive, K. S., White, C. E., Beekley, A. C., & Blackbourne, L. H. (2010). Current US military operations and implications for military surgical training. Journal of the American College of Surgeons, 211(5), 658-62. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2010.07.009
Tyler JA, et al. Current US Military Operations and Implications for Military Surgical Training. J Am Coll Surg. 2010;211(5):658-62. PubMed PMID: 20869271.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Current US military operations and implications for military surgical training. AU - Tyler,Joshua A, AU - Clive,Kevin S, AU - White,Christopher E, AU - Beekley,Alec C, AU - Blackbourne,Lorne H, PY - 2010/06/11/received PY - 2010/07/15/revised PY - 2010/07/15/accepted PY - 2010/9/28/entrez PY - 2010/9/28/pubmed PY - 2010/12/14/medline SP - 658 EP - 62 JF - Journal of the American College of Surgeons JO - J Am Coll Surg VL - 211 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Since 2001, US military surgeons have deployed frequently, with many surgeons deploying within 1 year of graduating residency. The purpose of this study was to evaluate readiness of recent graduates to manage combat-related injuries and to make recommendations for improvements in training military surgeons. STUDY DESIGN: We reviewed casualties treated at the 31st Combat Support Hospital in Baghdad from December 2003 to November 2004. We identified 3,426 wounded patients; of these, 2,648 (77.3%) required an operative procedure. There were 2,788 patients (81.4%) who sustained penetrating injuries. The most common procedures performed were debridement of wounds (39%), skeletal fixation (14.7%), and exploratory laparotomy (11.4%). Common procedures were compared with 15 case logs from the ACGME database for our institution from 2005 to 2009. RESULTS: Graduating residents averaged 973 cases during residency (range 867 to 1,293, median 921). This included experience with most procedures encountered except nephrectomy (1.5 procedures per resident [PPR]), craniotomy (1.1 PPRs), inferior vena cava injury (1.1 PPRs), bladder repair (0.87 PPR), and duodenal injury (0.6 PPR). Residents had minimal experience with skeletal fixation and external genital trauma. CONCLUSIONS: Recent surgical residency graduates are prepared for deployment in support of US military operations for the majority of injuries encountered. However, familiarization with procedures that fall outside the traditional general surgical curriculum would improve their ability to treat these injuries. To enhance experience with rare injuries, cadaver studies and animal models may serve as training tools before deployment. SN - 1879-1190 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20869271/Current_US_military_operations_and_implications_for_military_surgical_training_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -