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Safety and effectiveness of meglumine antimoniate in the treatment of Ethiopian visceral leishmaniasis patients with and without HIV co-infection.
Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2010 Nov; 104(11):706-12.TR

Abstract

In sub-Saharan Africa, visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is treated with either Pentostam(TM) (sodium antimony gluconate) or generic sodium stibogluconate (SSG), except in Uganda where Glucantime(®) (meglumine antimoniate) has been in use for at least a decade. Between January 2008 and February 2009, 54 Ethiopian VL patients were treated with Glucantime. The medical charts of these patients were reviewed to assess the effectiveness and safety profile of Glucantime in a routine healthcare setting. None of the patients from south Ethiopia (n=24) and 46.4% of the patients from north Ethiopia (n=30) were HIV co-infected. At completion of treatment (Day 31), cure rates were 78.6% (95% CI 59.0-91.7%) in north Ethiopia and 100% (95% CI 85.8-100%) in south Ethiopia. Thirty-three non-serious and six serious adverse events (two pancreatitis, one renal failure and three deaths) were observed in 26 patients. One-third of the non-serious adverse events were due to biochemical pancreatitis. During treatment, a case-fatality rate of 10.0% in north Ethiopia and 0.0% in south Ethiopia was noted. These data show that Glucantime can be as effective as Pentostam or SSG in HIV-negative patients. The data also point to clinical pancreatitis as a safety concern, especially in patients with HIV co-infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Gondar University Hospital, Gondar, Ethiopia. hailu_a2004@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20870258

Citation

Hailu, Workagegnehu, et al. "Safety and Effectiveness of Meglumine Antimoniate in the Treatment of Ethiopian Visceral Leishmaniasis Patients With and Without HIV Co-infection." Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 104, no. 11, 2010, pp. 706-12.
Hailu W, Weldegebreal T, Hurissa Z, et al. Safety and effectiveness of meglumine antimoniate in the treatment of Ethiopian visceral leishmaniasis patients with and without HIV co-infection. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2010;104(11):706-12.
Hailu, W., Weldegebreal, T., Hurissa, Z., Tafes, H., Omollo, R., Yifru, S., Balasegaram, M., & Hailu, A. (2010). Safety and effectiveness of meglumine antimoniate in the treatment of Ethiopian visceral leishmaniasis patients with and without HIV co-infection. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 104(11), 706-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trstmh.2010.07.007
Hailu W, et al. Safety and Effectiveness of Meglumine Antimoniate in the Treatment of Ethiopian Visceral Leishmaniasis Patients With and Without HIV Co-infection. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2010;104(11):706-12. PubMed PMID: 20870258.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Safety and effectiveness of meglumine antimoniate in the treatment of Ethiopian visceral leishmaniasis patients with and without HIV co-infection. AU - Hailu,Workagegnehu, AU - Weldegebreal,Teklu, AU - Hurissa,Zewdu, AU - Tafes,Hailemariam, AU - Omollo,Raymond, AU - Yifru,Sisay, AU - Balasegaram,Manica, AU - Hailu,Asrat, Y1 - 2010/09/27/ PY - 2009/10/31/received PY - 2010/07/22/revised PY - 2010/07/23/accepted PY - 2010/9/28/entrez PY - 2010/9/28/pubmed PY - 2011/2/25/medline SP - 706 EP - 12 JF - Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene JO - Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg VL - 104 IS - 11 N2 - In sub-Saharan Africa, visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is treated with either Pentostam(TM) (sodium antimony gluconate) or generic sodium stibogluconate (SSG), except in Uganda where Glucantime(®) (meglumine antimoniate) has been in use for at least a decade. Between January 2008 and February 2009, 54 Ethiopian VL patients were treated with Glucantime. The medical charts of these patients were reviewed to assess the effectiveness and safety profile of Glucantime in a routine healthcare setting. None of the patients from south Ethiopia (n=24) and 46.4% of the patients from north Ethiopia (n=30) were HIV co-infected. At completion of treatment (Day 31), cure rates were 78.6% (95% CI 59.0-91.7%) in north Ethiopia and 100% (95% CI 85.8-100%) in south Ethiopia. Thirty-three non-serious and six serious adverse events (two pancreatitis, one renal failure and three deaths) were observed in 26 patients. One-third of the non-serious adverse events were due to biochemical pancreatitis. During treatment, a case-fatality rate of 10.0% in north Ethiopia and 0.0% in south Ethiopia was noted. These data show that Glucantime can be as effective as Pentostam or SSG in HIV-negative patients. The data also point to clinical pancreatitis as a safety concern, especially in patients with HIV co-infection. SN - 1878-3503 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20870258/Safety_and_effectiveness_of_meglumine_antimoniate_in_the_treatment_of_Ethiopian_visceral_leishmaniasis_patients_with_and_without_HIV_co_infection_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0035-9203(10)00167-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -