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[Chlamydia trachomatis and urogenital mycoplasms in nonconococcal urethritis in men].
Med Pregl 2010 Jan-Feb; 63(1-2):47-50MP

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Nongonococcal urethritis is the most common sexually transmitted infection in men, with vast majority of the etiological agents such as Chlamydia trachomatis, followed by urogenital mycoplasmas. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis in nongonococcal urethritis in men, and to examine infections associated with these agents. Material and methods 299 sexually active, heterosexual men with nongonococcal urethritis were included into the study. Urethral samples were taken with a dacron swab placed into the urethra up to 2-3 cm. The Direct immunofluorescence technique was performed for identification of Chlamydia trachomatis. Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis were detected with Mycoplasma IST assay.

RESULTS

Chlamydia trachomatis was detected in 22.75%, Uraeplasma urealyticum in 21.08% and Mycoplasma hominis in 8.02% cases. We found no significant differences in prevalence between Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticym (p > 0.05). Monoinfections were found in 51.85% with significantly higher rate (p < 0.01) than associated infections (11.70%). Among associated infections, coinfection of Chlamydia trahomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum was predominant. Association of Chlamydia trachomatis with urogenital mycoplasmas was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than the one between Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis. In 36.45% patients no patogenic microorganisms were detected.

CONCLUSION

These results confirmed the etiological role of Chlamydia trachomatis and urogenital mycoplasmas in nongonococcal urethritis with prevalence of 51.85% in monoinfections and 11.70% in associated infections. In 36.45% of cases the etiology of urethritis was not elucidated. These results suggest that more sensitive diagnostic tool should be applied when searching for the derailed etiology of nongonococcal urethritis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institut za dermatovenerologiju, Klinicki centar Srbije, Beograd. sonja.vesic@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

srp

PubMed ID

20873309

Citation

Vesić, Sonja, et al. "[Chlamydia Trachomatis and Urogenital Mycoplasms in Nonconococcal Urethritis in Men]." Medicinski Pregled, vol. 63, no. 1-2, 2010, pp. 47-50.
Vesić S, Vukićević J, Gvozdenović E, et al. [Chlamydia trachomatis and urogenital mycoplasms in nonconococcal urethritis in men]. Med Pregl. 2010;63(1-2):47-50.
Vesić, S., Vukićević, J., Gvozdenović, E., Skiljević, D., Janosević, S., & Medenica, L. (2010). [Chlamydia trachomatis and urogenital mycoplasms in nonconococcal urethritis in men]. Medicinski Pregled, 63(1-2), pp. 47-50.
Vesić S, et al. [Chlamydia Trachomatis and Urogenital Mycoplasms in Nonconococcal Urethritis in Men]. Med Pregl. 2010;63(1-2):47-50. PubMed PMID: 20873309.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Chlamydia trachomatis and urogenital mycoplasms in nonconococcal urethritis in men]. AU - Vesić,Sonja, AU - Vukićević,Jelica, AU - Gvozdenović,Eleonora, AU - Skiljević,Dusan, AU - Janosević,Slobodanka, AU - Medenica,Ljiljana, PY - 2010/9/29/entrez PY - 2010/9/29/pubmed PY - 2010/10/21/medline SP - 47 EP - 50 JF - Medicinski pregled JO - Med. Pregl. VL - 63 IS - 1-2 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Nongonococcal urethritis is the most common sexually transmitted infection in men, with vast majority of the etiological agents such as Chlamydia trachomatis, followed by urogenital mycoplasmas. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Chlamydia trachomatis, Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis in nongonococcal urethritis in men, and to examine infections associated with these agents. Material and methods 299 sexually active, heterosexual men with nongonococcal urethritis were included into the study. Urethral samples were taken with a dacron swab placed into the urethra up to 2-3 cm. The Direct immunofluorescence technique was performed for identification of Chlamydia trachomatis. Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis were detected with Mycoplasma IST assay. RESULTS: Chlamydia trachomatis was detected in 22.75%, Uraeplasma urealyticum in 21.08% and Mycoplasma hominis in 8.02% cases. We found no significant differences in prevalence between Chlamydia trachomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticym (p > 0.05). Monoinfections were found in 51.85% with significantly higher rate (p < 0.01) than associated infections (11.70%). Among associated infections, coinfection of Chlamydia trahomatis and Ureaplasma urealyticum was predominant. Association of Chlamydia trachomatis with urogenital mycoplasmas was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than the one between Ureaplasma urealyticum and Mycoplasma hominis. In 36.45% patients no patogenic microorganisms were detected. CONCLUSION: These results confirmed the etiological role of Chlamydia trachomatis and urogenital mycoplasmas in nongonococcal urethritis with prevalence of 51.85% in monoinfections and 11.70% in associated infections. In 36.45% of cases the etiology of urethritis was not elucidated. These results suggest that more sensitive diagnostic tool should be applied when searching for the derailed etiology of nongonococcal urethritis. SN - 0025-8105 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20873309/[Chlamydia_trachomatis_and_urogenital_mycoplasms_in_nonconococcal_urethritis_in_men]_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/9709 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -