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Managing somatization phenomena in primary care.
Psychiatr Med. 1990; 8(4):117-27.PM

Abstract

Patients communicating psychological distress in the form of somatic symptoms and seeking medical care for them pose difficult diagnostic and treatment dilemmas for the primary care physician. Somatization may be conceptualized as an illness-focused behavior style, with multiple etiologies, rather than a single psychiatric disorder. Somatizing behavior is associated with emotional distress, cognitive-perceptual abnormalities, and socially learned illness behaviors. Although recognition of the somatizing patient begins with thorough medical evaluation, assessment should also include careful examination of social history and the affective meaning of symptoms. Management strategies will vary according to the etiology of the psychiatric diagnosis associated with physical symptoms; however, the essential element is provision of a long-term supportive relationship with a physician, who provides effective monitoring of physical and mental health status, appropriate emotional support, and reassurance concerning symptoms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry & Health Behavior, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2087565

Citation

Mabe, P A., et al. "Managing Somatization Phenomena in Primary Care." Psychiatric Medicine, vol. 8, no. 4, 1990, pp. 117-27.
Mabe PA, Jones LR, Riley WT. Managing somatization phenomena in primary care. Psychiatr Med. 1990;8(4):117-27.
Mabe, P. A., Jones, L. R., & Riley, W. T. (1990). Managing somatization phenomena in primary care. Psychiatric Medicine, 8(4), 117-27.
Mabe PA, Jones LR, Riley WT. Managing Somatization Phenomena in Primary Care. Psychiatr Med. 1990;8(4):117-27. PubMed PMID: 2087565.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Managing somatization phenomena in primary care. AU - Mabe,P A, AU - Jones,L R, AU - Riley,W T, PY - 1990/1/1/pubmed PY - 1990/1/1/medline PY - 1990/1/1/entrez SP - 117 EP - 27 JF - Psychiatric medicine JO - Psychiatr Med VL - 8 IS - 4 N2 - Patients communicating psychological distress in the form of somatic symptoms and seeking medical care for them pose difficult diagnostic and treatment dilemmas for the primary care physician. Somatization may be conceptualized as an illness-focused behavior style, with multiple etiologies, rather than a single psychiatric disorder. Somatizing behavior is associated with emotional distress, cognitive-perceptual abnormalities, and socially learned illness behaviors. Although recognition of the somatizing patient begins with thorough medical evaluation, assessment should also include careful examination of social history and the affective meaning of symptoms. Management strategies will vary according to the etiology of the psychiatric diagnosis associated with physical symptoms; however, the essential element is provision of a long-term supportive relationship with a physician, who provides effective monitoring of physical and mental health status, appropriate emotional support, and reassurance concerning symptoms. SN - 0732-0868 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2087565/Managing_somatization_phenomena_in_primary_care_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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