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No need for water supplementation for exclusively breast-fed infants under hot and arid conditions.
Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 1990 Jul-Aug; 84(4):602-4.TR

Abstract

This study was conducted in 4 villages in India during the hottest and driest season of the year to determine whether exclusively breast-fed infants need additional water under extremely hot and dry climatic conditions. The ambient temperature was 35-40 degrees C and the relative humidity 10-35%, except during the early morning hours. 63 urine samples were collected from 31 infants below 6 months of age and 28 samples from 13 infants aged 6-10 months, all of whom were receiving nothing but breast milk. Specific gravity (and corresponding osmolality) of urine samples from the younger group ranged from 1.004 (66 mosmol/litre) to 1.036 (1234 mosmol/litre), with a mean of 1.011 (322 mosmol/litre). For the older group the range was 1.005 (103 mosmol/litre) to 1.029 (978 mosmol/litre) and the mean was 1.015 (468 mosmol/litre). These values are well below levels of urine concentrations known to be attainable by infants of corresponding ages. Thus, even under hotter and drier climatic conditions than have previously been studied, healthy exclusively breast-fed infants do not require additional water. Exclusive breast feeding for the first 4-6 months is therefore a reasonable public health recommendation; it is imperative in areas where contaminated drinking water may contribute to infant morbidity, diarrhoeal disease in particular.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Rural Health Studies, Hyderabad, India.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2091363

Citation

Almroth, S, and P D. Bidinger. "No Need for Water Supplementation for Exclusively Breast-fed Infants Under Hot and Arid Conditions." Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 84, no. 4, 1990, pp. 602-4.
Almroth S, Bidinger PD. No need for water supplementation for exclusively breast-fed infants under hot and arid conditions. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 1990;84(4):602-4.
Almroth, S., & Bidinger, P. D. (1990). No need for water supplementation for exclusively breast-fed infants under hot and arid conditions. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 84(4), 602-4.
Almroth S, Bidinger PD. No Need for Water Supplementation for Exclusively Breast-fed Infants Under Hot and Arid Conditions. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 1990 Jul-Aug;84(4):602-4. PubMed PMID: 2091363.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - No need for water supplementation for exclusively breast-fed infants under hot and arid conditions. AU - Almroth,S, AU - Bidinger,P D, PY - 1990/7/1/pubmed PY - 1990/7/1/medline PY - 1990/7/1/entrez KW - Asia KW - Biology KW - Breast Feeding--beneficial effects KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developing Countries KW - Environment KW - Examinations And Diagnoses KW - Fluid Balance KW - Health KW - Homeostasis KW - India KW - Infant Nutrition KW - Laboratory Examinations And Diagnoses KW - Natural Resources KW - Nutrition KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Rural Population KW - Southern Asia KW - Water Supply--complications SP - 602 EP - 4 JF - Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene JO - Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg VL - 84 IS - 4 N2 - This study was conducted in 4 villages in India during the hottest and driest season of the year to determine whether exclusively breast-fed infants need additional water under extremely hot and dry climatic conditions. The ambient temperature was 35-40 degrees C and the relative humidity 10-35%, except during the early morning hours. 63 urine samples were collected from 31 infants below 6 months of age and 28 samples from 13 infants aged 6-10 months, all of whom were receiving nothing but breast milk. Specific gravity (and corresponding osmolality) of urine samples from the younger group ranged from 1.004 (66 mosmol/litre) to 1.036 (1234 mosmol/litre), with a mean of 1.011 (322 mosmol/litre). For the older group the range was 1.005 (103 mosmol/litre) to 1.029 (978 mosmol/litre) and the mean was 1.015 (468 mosmol/litre). These values are well below levels of urine concentrations known to be attainable by infants of corresponding ages. Thus, even under hotter and drier climatic conditions than have previously been studied, healthy exclusively breast-fed infants do not require additional water. Exclusive breast feeding for the first 4-6 months is therefore a reasonable public health recommendation; it is imperative in areas where contaminated drinking water may contribute to infant morbidity, diarrhoeal disease in particular. SN - 0035-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2091363/No_need_for_water_supplementation_for_exclusively_breast_fed_infants_under_hot_and_arid_conditions_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/trstmh/article-lookup/doi/10.1016/0035-9203(90)90056-k DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -