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Bioluminescence imaging of glucose in tissue surrounding polyurethane and glucose sensor implants.
J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2010 Sep 01; 4(5):1055-62.JD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The bioluminescence technique was used to quantify the local glucose concentration in the tissue surrounding subcutaneously implanted polyurethane material and surrounding glucose sensors. In addition, some implants were coated with a single layer of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) because these cells improve the wound-healing response around biomaterials.

METHODS

Control and ASC-coated implants were implanted subcutaneously in rats for 1 or 8 weeks (polyurethane) or for 1 week only (glucose sensors). Tissue biopsies adjacent to the implant were immediately frozen at the time of explant. Cryosections were assayed for glucose concentration profile using the bioluminescence technique.

RESULTS

For the polyurethane samples, no significant differences in glucose concentration within 100 μm of the implant surface were found between bare and ASC-coated implants at 1 or 8 weeks. A glucose concentration gradient was demonstrated around the glucose sensors. For all sensors, the minimum glucose concentration of approximately 4 mM was found at the implant surface and increased with distance from the sensor surface until the glucose concentration peaked at approximately 7 mM at 100 μm. Then the glucose concentration decreased to 5.5-6.5 mM more than 100 μmm from the surface.

CONCLUSIONS

The ASC attachment to polyurethane and to glucose sensors did not change the glucose profiles in the tissue surrounding the implants. Although most glucose sensors incorporate a diffusion barrier to reduce the gradient of glucose and oxygen in the tissue, it is typically assumed that there is no steep glucose gradient around the sensors. However, a glucose gradient was observed around the sensors. A more complete understanding of glucose transport and concentration gradients around sensors is critical.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20920425

Citation

Prichard, Heather L., et al. "Bioluminescence Imaging of Glucose in Tissue Surrounding Polyurethane and Glucose Sensor Implants." Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, vol. 4, no. 5, 2010, pp. 1055-62.
Prichard HL, Schroeder T, Reichert WM, et al. Bioluminescence imaging of glucose in tissue surrounding polyurethane and glucose sensor implants. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2010;4(5):1055-62.
Prichard, H. L., Schroeder, T., Reichert, W. M., & Klitzman, B. (2010). Bioluminescence imaging of glucose in tissue surrounding polyurethane and glucose sensor implants. Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, 4(5), 1055-62.
Prichard HL, et al. Bioluminescence Imaging of Glucose in Tissue Surrounding Polyurethane and Glucose Sensor Implants. J Diabetes Sci Technol. 2010 Sep 1;4(5):1055-62. PubMed PMID: 20920425.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bioluminescence imaging of glucose in tissue surrounding polyurethane and glucose sensor implants. AU - Prichard,Heather L, AU - Schroeder,Thies, AU - Reichert,William M, AU - Klitzman,Bruce, Y1 - 2010/09/01/ PY - 2010/10/6/entrez PY - 2010/10/6/pubmed PY - 2011/2/11/medline SP - 1055 EP - 62 JF - Journal of diabetes science and technology JO - J Diabetes Sci Technol VL - 4 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The bioluminescence technique was used to quantify the local glucose concentration in the tissue surrounding subcutaneously implanted polyurethane material and surrounding glucose sensors. In addition, some implants were coated with a single layer of adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) because these cells improve the wound-healing response around biomaterials. METHODS: Control and ASC-coated implants were implanted subcutaneously in rats for 1 or 8 weeks (polyurethane) or for 1 week only (glucose sensors). Tissue biopsies adjacent to the implant were immediately frozen at the time of explant. Cryosections were assayed for glucose concentration profile using the bioluminescence technique. RESULTS: For the polyurethane samples, no significant differences in glucose concentration within 100 μm of the implant surface were found between bare and ASC-coated implants at 1 or 8 weeks. A glucose concentration gradient was demonstrated around the glucose sensors. For all sensors, the minimum glucose concentration of approximately 4 mM was found at the implant surface and increased with distance from the sensor surface until the glucose concentration peaked at approximately 7 mM at 100 μm. Then the glucose concentration decreased to 5.5-6.5 mM more than 100 μmm from the surface. CONCLUSIONS: The ASC attachment to polyurethane and to glucose sensors did not change the glucose profiles in the tissue surrounding the implants. Although most glucose sensors incorporate a diffusion barrier to reduce the gradient of glucose and oxygen in the tissue, it is typically assumed that there is no steep glucose gradient around the sensors. However, a glucose gradient was observed around the sensors. A more complete understanding of glucose transport and concentration gradients around sensors is critical. SN - 1932-2968 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20920425/Bioluminescence_imaging_of_glucose_in_tissue_surrounding_polyurethane_and_glucose_sensor_implants_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/193229681000400504?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -