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Ethnicity moderates the influence of perceived social status on subjective sleep quality.
Behav Sleep Med. 2010; 8(4):194-206.BS

Abstract

It has long been recognized that socioeconomic status (SES) influences health and health-related behaviors, and it has been suggested that the adverse impact of low SES on health may be partly mediated by poor sleep quality. The relation between sleep and objective and subjective measures of SES has only been explored in a preliminary manner, providing indirect evidence that associations between SES and health might be explained, in part, by disrupted sleep. However, it remains unclear whether low SES directly affects sleep quality or whether the SES-sleep quality relation varies as a function of ethnicity given robust ethnic disparities across SES-related factors. This study examined the relation between perceived social status (i.e., individuals' perception of their socioeconomic standing) and subjective sleep quality among 149 college students, and examined the moderating effect of ethnicity to determine whether the magnitude or direction of association differed among Caucasian, Asian, and African Americans. Using hierarchical regressions and a dummy-coded ethnicity variable, results demonstrated significant moderation (ΔR₂ = 0.04, p = .02), such that both Asian (p = .04) and African Americans (p = .02) were significantly different from Caucasian Americans. Lower perceived social status was related to greater impairment in sleep quality for Asian Americans (β = -.37, p < .01) and African Americans (β = -.51, p < .01), but not Caucasian Americans (β = -.02, p = .87). These findings provide initial support for the negative impact of low perceived social status on sleep quality for specific subgroups of ethnic minorities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA. bgoodin1@umbc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20924833

Citation

Goodin, Burel R., et al. "Ethnicity Moderates the Influence of Perceived Social Status On Subjective Sleep Quality." Behavioral Sleep Medicine, vol. 8, no. 4, 2010, pp. 194-206.
Goodin BR, McGuire L, Smith MT. Ethnicity moderates the influence of perceived social status on subjective sleep quality. Behav Sleep Med. 2010;8(4):194-206.
Goodin, B. R., McGuire, L., & Smith, M. T. (2010). Ethnicity moderates the influence of perceived social status on subjective sleep quality. Behavioral Sleep Medicine, 8(4), 194-206. https://doi.org/10.1080/15402002.2010.509193
Goodin BR, McGuire L, Smith MT. Ethnicity Moderates the Influence of Perceived Social Status On Subjective Sleep Quality. Behav Sleep Med. 2010;8(4):194-206. PubMed PMID: 20924833.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ethnicity moderates the influence of perceived social status on subjective sleep quality. AU - Goodin,Burel R, AU - McGuire,Lynanne, AU - Smith,Michael T, PY - 2010/10/7/entrez PY - 2010/10/7/pubmed PY - 2011/2/9/medline SP - 194 EP - 206 JF - Behavioral sleep medicine JO - Behav Sleep Med VL - 8 IS - 4 N2 - It has long been recognized that socioeconomic status (SES) influences health and health-related behaviors, and it has been suggested that the adverse impact of low SES on health may be partly mediated by poor sleep quality. The relation between sleep and objective and subjective measures of SES has only been explored in a preliminary manner, providing indirect evidence that associations between SES and health might be explained, in part, by disrupted sleep. However, it remains unclear whether low SES directly affects sleep quality or whether the SES-sleep quality relation varies as a function of ethnicity given robust ethnic disparities across SES-related factors. This study examined the relation between perceived social status (i.e., individuals' perception of their socioeconomic standing) and subjective sleep quality among 149 college students, and examined the moderating effect of ethnicity to determine whether the magnitude or direction of association differed among Caucasian, Asian, and African Americans. Using hierarchical regressions and a dummy-coded ethnicity variable, results demonstrated significant moderation (ΔR₂ = 0.04, p = .02), such that both Asian (p = .04) and African Americans (p = .02) were significantly different from Caucasian Americans. Lower perceived social status was related to greater impairment in sleep quality for Asian Americans (β = -.37, p < .01) and African Americans (β = -.51, p < .01), but not Caucasian Americans (β = -.02, p = .87). These findings provide initial support for the negative impact of low perceived social status on sleep quality for specific subgroups of ethnic minorities. SN - 1540-2010 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20924833/Ethnicity_moderates_the_influence_of_perceived_social_status_on_subjective_sleep_quality_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15402002.2010.509193 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -