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Cognitive function and risk for depression in old age: a meta-analysis of published literature.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

We assessed the relationship between cognitive impairment (including mild cognitive impairment with no signs of dementia, and dementia) and risk for depression in old age (60 years and older).

METHODS

MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library database were used to identify potential studies. All of the clinical studies that produced data on the association between cognitive function and risk of depression among individuals aged 55 years or older were identified and included in this review. The studies were classified into cross-sectional and longitudinal subsets. The quantitative meta-analysis of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were performed. For prevalence and incidence rates of depression, odds risk (OR) and relative risk (RR) were calculated, respectively.

RESULTS

Since all but two studies found in the search were for individuals aged 60 years or over, we assessed and reported on results for this larger group only. In this review we included 13 cross-sectional and four prospective longitudinal studies. The quantitative meta-analysis showed that, in old age, individuals with non-dementia cognitive impairment had neither significant higher prevalence nor incidence rates of depression than those without (odds risk (OR): 1.48, 95% confidence intervals (95% CI): 0.87-2.52; relative risk (RR): 1.12, 95% CI: 0.62-2.01). In old age, individuals with dementia had both significant higher prevalence and incidence rates of depression than those without (OR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.15-2.89; RR: 3.92, 95% CI: 1.93-7.99).

CONCLUSIONS

Despite the methodological limitations of this meta-analysis, we found that in old age, there was no association between depression and cognitive impairment with no dementia; however, there was a definite association between depression and dementia and thus dementia might be a risk for depression.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Key Laboratory of Chronobiology of Health Ministry, Basic and Forensic School, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.

    , , ,

    Source

    International psychogeriatrics 23:4 2011 May pg 516-25

    MeSH

    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Aging
    Cognition
    Dementia
    Depression
    Humans
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    20937170

    Citation

    Huang, Chang-Quan, et al. "Cognitive Function and Risk for Depression in Old Age: a Meta-analysis of Published Literature." International Psychogeriatrics, vol. 23, no. 4, 2011, pp. 516-25.
    Huang CQ, Wang ZR, Li YH, et al. Cognitive function and risk for depression in old age: a meta-analysis of published literature. Int Psychogeriatr. 2011;23(4):516-25.
    Huang, C. Q., Wang, Z. R., Li, Y. H., Xie, Y. Z., & Liu, Q. X. (2011). Cognitive function and risk for depression in old age: a meta-analysis of published literature. International Psychogeriatrics, 23(4), pp. 516-25. doi:10.1017/S1041610210000049.
    Huang CQ, et al. Cognitive Function and Risk for Depression in Old Age: a Meta-analysis of Published Literature. Int Psychogeriatr. 2011;23(4):516-25. PubMed PMID: 20937170.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Cognitive function and risk for depression in old age: a meta-analysis of published literature. AU - Huang,Chang-Quan, AU - Wang,Zheng-Rong, AU - Li,Yong-Hong, AU - Xie,Yi-Zhou, AU - Liu,Qing-Xiu, Y1 - 2010/10/12/ PY - 2010/10/13/entrez PY - 2010/10/13/pubmed PY - 2011/8/19/medline SP - 516 EP - 25 JF - International psychogeriatrics JO - Int Psychogeriatr VL - 23 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: We assessed the relationship between cognitive impairment (including mild cognitive impairment with no signs of dementia, and dementia) and risk for depression in old age (60 years and older). METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library database were used to identify potential studies. All of the clinical studies that produced data on the association between cognitive function and risk of depression among individuals aged 55 years or older were identified and included in this review. The studies were classified into cross-sectional and longitudinal subsets. The quantitative meta-analysis of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were performed. For prevalence and incidence rates of depression, odds risk (OR) and relative risk (RR) were calculated, respectively. RESULTS: Since all but two studies found in the search were for individuals aged 60 years or over, we assessed and reported on results for this larger group only. In this review we included 13 cross-sectional and four prospective longitudinal studies. The quantitative meta-analysis showed that, in old age, individuals with non-dementia cognitive impairment had neither significant higher prevalence nor incidence rates of depression than those without (odds risk (OR): 1.48, 95% confidence intervals (95% CI): 0.87-2.52; relative risk (RR): 1.12, 95% CI: 0.62-2.01). In old age, individuals with dementia had both significant higher prevalence and incidence rates of depression than those without (OR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.15-2.89; RR: 3.92, 95% CI: 1.93-7.99). CONCLUSIONS: Despite the methodological limitations of this meta-analysis, we found that in old age, there was no association between depression and cognitive impairment with no dementia; however, there was a definite association between depression and dementia and thus dementia might be a risk for depression. SN - 1741-203X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20937170/Cognitive_function_and_risk_for_depression_in_old_age:_a_meta_analysis_of_published_literature_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1041610210000049/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -