Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Fruit and vegetable intake in relation to risk of breast cancer in the Black Women's Health Study.
Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Dec 01; 172(11):1268-79.AJ

Abstract

The authors prospectively examined the relation of fruit and vegetable intake to breast cancer risk among 51,928 women aged 21-69 years at enrollment in 1995 in the Black Women's Health Study. Dietary intake was assessed by using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for breast cancer risk factors. During 12 years of follow-up, there were 1,268 incident cases of breast cancer. Total fruit, total vegetable, and total fruit and vegetable intakes were not significantly associated with overall risk of breast cancer. However, total vegetable consumption was associated with a decreased risk of estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer (incidence rate ratio = 0.57, 95% confidence interval: 0.38, 0.85, for ≥2 servings/day relative to <4/week; P(trend) = 0.02). In addition, there was some evidence of inverse associations with breast cancer risk overall for cruciferous vegetable intake (P(trend) = 0.06) and for carrot intake (P(trend) = 0.02). Study findings suggest that frequent consumption of vegetables is inversely associated with risk of estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer, and that specific vegetables may be associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer overall.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. dboggs@bu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20937636

Citation

Boggs, Deborah A., et al. "Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Relation to Risk of Breast Cancer in the Black Women's Health Study." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 172, no. 11, 2010, pp. 1268-79.
Boggs DA, Palmer JR, Wise LA, et al. Fruit and vegetable intake in relation to risk of breast cancer in the Black Women's Health Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2010;172(11):1268-79.
Boggs, D. A., Palmer, J. R., Wise, L. A., Spiegelman, D., Stampfer, M. J., Adams-Campbell, L. L., & Rosenberg, L. (2010). Fruit and vegetable intake in relation to risk of breast cancer in the Black Women's Health Study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 172(11), 1268-79. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwq293
Boggs DA, et al. Fruit and Vegetable Intake in Relation to Risk of Breast Cancer in the Black Women's Health Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2010 Dec 1;172(11):1268-79. PubMed PMID: 20937636.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fruit and vegetable intake in relation to risk of breast cancer in the Black Women's Health Study. AU - Boggs,Deborah A, AU - Palmer,Julie R, AU - Wise,Lauren A, AU - Spiegelman,Donna, AU - Stampfer,Meir J, AU - Adams-Campbell,Lucile L, AU - Rosenberg,Lynn, Y1 - 2010/10/11/ PY - 2010/10/13/entrez PY - 2010/10/13/pubmed PY - 2010/12/24/medline SP - 1268 EP - 79 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 172 IS - 11 N2 - The authors prospectively examined the relation of fruit and vegetable intake to breast cancer risk among 51,928 women aged 21-69 years at enrollment in 1995 in the Black Women's Health Study. Dietary intake was assessed by using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate incidence rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals, adjusted for breast cancer risk factors. During 12 years of follow-up, there were 1,268 incident cases of breast cancer. Total fruit, total vegetable, and total fruit and vegetable intakes were not significantly associated with overall risk of breast cancer. However, total vegetable consumption was associated with a decreased risk of estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer (incidence rate ratio = 0.57, 95% confidence interval: 0.38, 0.85, for ≥2 servings/day relative to <4/week; P(trend) = 0.02). In addition, there was some evidence of inverse associations with breast cancer risk overall for cruciferous vegetable intake (P(trend) = 0.06) and for carrot intake (P(trend) = 0.02). Study findings suggest that frequent consumption of vegetables is inversely associated with risk of estrogen receptor-negative/progesterone receptor-negative breast cancer, and that specific vegetables may be associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer overall. SN - 1476-6256 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20937636/Fruit_and_vegetable_intake_in_relation_to_risk_of_breast_cancer_in_the_Black_Women's_Health_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwq293 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -