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Long-term outcomes of injection laryngoplasty in patients with potentially recoverable vocal fold paralysis.
Laryngoscope. 2010 Nov; 120(11):2237-40.L

Abstract

OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS

Injection laryngoplasty (IL) is a temporary intervention for unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). IL is often performed in patients with a potentially recoverable recurrent laryngeal nerve insult while awaiting spontaneous recovery, compensation, or definitive intervention. This study investigates the long-term outcomes of subjects treated with an IL.

STUDY DESIGN

Restrospective chart review.

METHODS

A single-institution, retrospective review was performed from January 2004 to July 2008; subjects with potentially recoverable UVFP who underwent an IL were included.

RESULTS

The following etiologies were noted for the 42 subjects included: idiopathic in 13 (31%), iatrogenic in 25 (60%), infectious in two (5%), traumatic in one (2%), and stroke in one (2%). Ten subjects (24%) had full recovery of their paralysis, four (10%) partially recovered movement with adequate recovery of voice, 16 (40%) had no recovery of motion but compensation with adequate recovery of voice, 12 (29%) required further definitive intervention in the form of laryngeal framework surgery. Voice-related quality of life scores improved for all patients surveyed after IL and improved more for those who ultimately recovered or compensated.

CONCLUSIONS

The majority of subjects with potentially recoverable UVFP recover vocal fold motion and/or adequate voice after IL without permanent intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Emory Voice Center, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20939083

Citation

Arviso, Lindsey C., et al. "Long-term Outcomes of Injection Laryngoplasty in Patients With Potentially Recoverable Vocal Fold Paralysis." The Laryngoscope, vol. 120, no. 11, 2010, pp. 2237-40.
Arviso LC, Johns MM, Mathison CC, et al. Long-term outcomes of injection laryngoplasty in patients with potentially recoverable vocal fold paralysis. Laryngoscope. 2010;120(11):2237-40.
Arviso, L. C., Johns, M. M., Mathison, C. C., & Klein, A. M. (2010). Long-term outcomes of injection laryngoplasty in patients with potentially recoverable vocal fold paralysis. The Laryngoscope, 120(11), 2237-40. https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.21143
Arviso LC, et al. Long-term Outcomes of Injection Laryngoplasty in Patients With Potentially Recoverable Vocal Fold Paralysis. Laryngoscope. 2010;120(11):2237-40. PubMed PMID: 20939083.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term outcomes of injection laryngoplasty in patients with potentially recoverable vocal fold paralysis. AU - Arviso,Lindsey C, AU - Johns,Michael M,3rd AU - Mathison,Clyde C, AU - Klein,Adam M, PY - 2010/10/13/entrez PY - 2010/10/13/pubmed PY - 2011/1/8/medline SP - 2237 EP - 40 JF - The Laryngoscope JO - Laryngoscope VL - 120 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Injection laryngoplasty (IL) is a temporary intervention for unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). IL is often performed in patients with a potentially recoverable recurrent laryngeal nerve insult while awaiting spontaneous recovery, compensation, or definitive intervention. This study investigates the long-term outcomes of subjects treated with an IL. STUDY DESIGN: Restrospective chart review. METHODS: A single-institution, retrospective review was performed from January 2004 to July 2008; subjects with potentially recoverable UVFP who underwent an IL were included. RESULTS: The following etiologies were noted for the 42 subjects included: idiopathic in 13 (31%), iatrogenic in 25 (60%), infectious in two (5%), traumatic in one (2%), and stroke in one (2%). Ten subjects (24%) had full recovery of their paralysis, four (10%) partially recovered movement with adequate recovery of voice, 16 (40%) had no recovery of motion but compensation with adequate recovery of voice, 12 (29%) required further definitive intervention in the form of laryngeal framework surgery. Voice-related quality of life scores improved for all patients surveyed after IL and improved more for those who ultimately recovered or compensated. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of subjects with potentially recoverable UVFP recover vocal fold motion and/or adequate voice after IL without permanent intervention. SN - 1531-4995 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20939083/Long_term_outcomes_of_injection_laryngoplasty_in_patients_with_potentially_recoverable_vocal_fold_paralysis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/lary.21143 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -