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Physicians slow to e-mail routinely with patients.

Abstract

Some experts view e-mail between physicians and patients as a potential tool to improve physician-patient communication and, ultimately, patient care. Despite indications that many patients want to e-mail their physicians, physician adoption and use of e-mail with patients remains uncommon--only 6.7 percent of office-based physicians routinely e-mailed patients in 2008, according to a new national study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Overall, about one-third of office-based physicians reported that information technology (IT) was available in their practice for e-mailing patients about clinical issues. Of those, fewer than one in five reported using e-mail with patients routinely; the remaining physicians were roughly evenly split between occasional users and non-users. Physicians in practices with access to electronic medical records and those working in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) or medical school settings were more likely to adopt and use e-mail to communicate with patients compared with other physicians. However, even among the highest users--physicians in group/staff-model HMOs--only 50.6 percent reported routinely e-mailing patients.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20939158

Citation

Boukus, Ellyn R., et al. "Physicians Slow to E-mail Routinely With Patients." Issue Brief (Center for Studying Health System Change), 2010, pp. 1-5.
Boukus ER, Grossman JM, O'Malley AS. Physicians slow to e-mail routinely with patients. Issue Brief Cent Stud Health Syst Change. 2010.
Boukus, E. R., Grossman, J. M., & O'Malley, A. S. (2010). Physicians slow to e-mail routinely with patients. Issue Brief (Center for Studying Health System Change), (134), 1-5.
Boukus ER, Grossman JM, O'Malley AS. Physicians Slow to E-mail Routinely With Patients. Issue Brief Cent Stud Health Syst Change. 2010;(134)1-5. PubMed PMID: 20939158.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Physicians slow to e-mail routinely with patients. AU - Boukus,Ellyn R, AU - Grossman,Joy M, AU - O'Malley,Ann S, PY - 2010/10/14/entrez PY - 2010/10/14/pubmed PY - 2010/10/20/medline SP - 1 EP - 5 JF - Issue brief (Center for Studying Health System Change) JO - Issue Brief Cent Stud Health Syst Change IS - 134 N2 - Some experts view e-mail between physicians and patients as a potential tool to improve physician-patient communication and, ultimately, patient care. Despite indications that many patients want to e-mail their physicians, physician adoption and use of e-mail with patients remains uncommon--only 6.7 percent of office-based physicians routinely e-mailed patients in 2008, according to a new national study from the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC). Overall, about one-third of office-based physicians reported that information technology (IT) was available in their practice for e-mailing patients about clinical issues. Of those, fewer than one in five reported using e-mail with patients routinely; the remaining physicians were roughly evenly split between occasional users and non-users. Physicians in practices with access to electronic medical records and those working in health maintenance organizations (HMOs) or medical school settings were more likely to adopt and use e-mail to communicate with patients compared with other physicians. However, even among the highest users--physicians in group/staff-model HMOs--only 50.6 percent reported routinely e-mailing patients. UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20939158/Physicians_slow_to_e_mail_routinely_with_patients_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -