Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Concurrent drug use and the risk of perforated colonic diverticular disease: a population-based case-control study.
Gut. 2011 Feb; 60(2):219-24.Gut

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the risk of diverticular perforation associated with current and ever use of corticosteroids, opiate analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin, cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, statins and calcium antagonists.

DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS

Case-control analysis using conditional logistic regression analysis of data from the UK General Practice Research Database. The study involved 899 cases of incident diverticular perforation and 8980 population controls from 1990 to 2005.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Odds ratios (ORs) are presented for perforation associated with use of corticosteroids, opiate analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin, cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, statins and calcium antagonists. Data were adjusted for smoking, comorbidity, prior abdominal pain and body mass index.

RESULTS

A total of 899 patients with an incident diagnosis of perforated diverticular disease were identified. Current use of opiate analgesics (OR=2.16; 95% CI 1.55 to 3.01) and oral corticosteroids (OR=2.74; 95% CI 1.63 to 4.61) was associated with a two- and threefold increase in the risk of diverticular perforation, respectively. Current use of a calcium antagonist and aspirin were not associated with an increased risk of diverticular perforation. Current statin use was associated with a reduction in the risk of perforation (OR=0.44; 95% CI 0.20 to 0.95).

CONCLUSION

Perforated diverticular disease is a serious surgical emergency with current opiate analgesics and oral corticosteroids being strongly associated with an increased risk of diverticular perforation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nottingham Digestive Disease Centre and Biomedical Research Unit, Department of Surgery, QMC Campus, E Floor, West Block, Nottingham University Hospital NHS Trust, Derby Road, Nottingham NG72UH, UK. david.humes@nottingham.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20940283

Citation

Humes, David J., et al. "Concurrent Drug Use and the Risk of Perforated Colonic Diverticular Disease: a Population-based Case-control Study." Gut, vol. 60, no. 2, 2011, pp. 219-24.
Humes DJ, Fleming KM, Spiller RC, et al. Concurrent drug use and the risk of perforated colonic diverticular disease: a population-based case-control study. Gut. 2011;60(2):219-24.
Humes, D. J., Fleming, K. M., Spiller, R. C., & West, J. (2011). Concurrent drug use and the risk of perforated colonic diverticular disease: a population-based case-control study. Gut, 60(2), 219-24. https://doi.org/10.1136/gut.2010.217281
Humes DJ, et al. Concurrent Drug Use and the Risk of Perforated Colonic Diverticular Disease: a Population-based Case-control Study. Gut. 2011;60(2):219-24. PubMed PMID: 20940283.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Concurrent drug use and the risk of perforated colonic diverticular disease: a population-based case-control study. AU - Humes,David J, AU - Fleming,Kate M, AU - Spiller,Robin C, AU - West,Joe, Y1 - 2010/10/12/ PY - 2010/10/14/entrez PY - 2010/10/14/pubmed PY - 2011/2/4/medline SP - 219 EP - 24 JF - Gut JO - Gut VL - 60 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the risk of diverticular perforation associated with current and ever use of corticosteroids, opiate analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin, cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, statins and calcium antagonists. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Case-control analysis using conditional logistic regression analysis of data from the UK General Practice Research Database. The study involved 899 cases of incident diverticular perforation and 8980 population controls from 1990 to 2005. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Odds ratios (ORs) are presented for perforation associated with use of corticosteroids, opiate analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, aspirin, cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, statins and calcium antagonists. Data were adjusted for smoking, comorbidity, prior abdominal pain and body mass index. RESULTS: A total of 899 patients with an incident diagnosis of perforated diverticular disease were identified. Current use of opiate analgesics (OR=2.16; 95% CI 1.55 to 3.01) and oral corticosteroids (OR=2.74; 95% CI 1.63 to 4.61) was associated with a two- and threefold increase in the risk of diverticular perforation, respectively. Current use of a calcium antagonist and aspirin were not associated with an increased risk of diverticular perforation. Current statin use was associated with a reduction in the risk of perforation (OR=0.44; 95% CI 0.20 to 0.95). CONCLUSION: Perforated diverticular disease is a serious surgical emergency with current opiate analgesics and oral corticosteroids being strongly associated with an increased risk of diverticular perforation. SN - 1468-3288 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20940283/Concurrent_drug_use_and_the_risk_of_perforated_colonic_diverticular_disease:_a_population_based_case_control_study_ L2 - https://gut.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=20940283 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -