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Diabetes management of elective hospital admissions.
Diabet Med. 2010 Nov; 27(11):1289-94.DM

Abstract

AIMS

At any given time, people with diabetes occupy approximately 10-20% of acute hospital beds. In addition, diabetes is associated with a greater length of stay. Patients undergoing elective procedures occupy approximately 50% of hospital beds. The aim of this 12-month project was to improve the quality of diabetes care for elective inpatients. The primary outcome measure was length of stay.

METHODS

A team was established to improve the quality of care and reduce the length of stay of all patients admitted electively with diabetes. Specific areas of focus were surgical pre-assessment, planning the admission, post-operative care and planning a safe discharge. A retrospective audit of all elective patients with a coded diagnosis of diabetes admitted between June 2008 and June 2009 was performed.

RESULTS

Comparing the year of the project with the preceding year day-case rates for patients with diabetes increased by 34.8% for diabetes vs. 13.7% for the total hospital population (P for difference=0.048). There was a significant fall in diabetes length of stay of 0.34 days comparing 2008 and 2009 (P=0.040). Over the same period, we have shown a smaller reduction in length of stay for all other admissions of 0.08 days (p=0.039).

CONCLUSION

A team specifically employed to focus on elective inpatient diabetes care have a significant impact on length of stay of this patient group with potential cost savings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Endocrinology, Plymouth Diabetes Service, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth. Daniel.flanagan@phnt.swest.nhs.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20950388

Citation

Flanagan, D, et al. "Diabetes Management of Elective Hospital Admissions." Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, vol. 27, no. 11, 2010, pp. 1289-94.
Flanagan D, Ellis J, Baggott A, et al. Diabetes management of elective hospital admissions. Diabet Med. 2010;27(11):1289-94.
Flanagan, D., Ellis, J., Baggott, A., Grimsehl, K., & English, P. (2010). Diabetes management of elective hospital admissions. Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, 27(11), 1289-94. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1464-5491.2010.03114.x
Flanagan D, et al. Diabetes Management of Elective Hospital Admissions. Diabet Med. 2010;27(11):1289-94. PubMed PMID: 20950388.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diabetes management of elective hospital admissions. AU - Flanagan,D, AU - Ellis,J, AU - Baggott,A, AU - Grimsehl,K, AU - English,P, PY - 2010/10/19/entrez PY - 2010/10/19/pubmed PY - 2011/1/8/medline SP - 1289 EP - 94 JF - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association JO - Diabet Med VL - 27 IS - 11 N2 - AIMS: At any given time, people with diabetes occupy approximately 10-20% of acute hospital beds. In addition, diabetes is associated with a greater length of stay. Patients undergoing elective procedures occupy approximately 50% of hospital beds. The aim of this 12-month project was to improve the quality of diabetes care for elective inpatients. The primary outcome measure was length of stay. METHODS: A team was established to improve the quality of care and reduce the length of stay of all patients admitted electively with diabetes. Specific areas of focus were surgical pre-assessment, planning the admission, post-operative care and planning a safe discharge. A retrospective audit of all elective patients with a coded diagnosis of diabetes admitted between June 2008 and June 2009 was performed. RESULTS: Comparing the year of the project with the preceding year day-case rates for patients with diabetes increased by 34.8% for diabetes vs. 13.7% for the total hospital population (P for difference=0.048). There was a significant fall in diabetes length of stay of 0.34 days comparing 2008 and 2009 (P=0.040). Over the same period, we have shown a smaller reduction in length of stay for all other admissions of 0.08 days (p=0.039). CONCLUSION: A team specifically employed to focus on elective inpatient diabetes care have a significant impact on length of stay of this patient group with potential cost savings. SN - 1464-5491 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20950388/Diabetes_management_of_elective_hospital_admissions_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -