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The Venus effect in real life and in photographs.
Atten Percept Psychophys. 2010 Oct; 72(7):1948-64.AP

Abstract

The toilet of Venus is the subject of many paintings. Typically, Venus appears with a small mirror in which her face is visible. Observers tend to say that Venus is admiring herself in a mirror, even when the location of the mirror makes this impossible. We demonstrate that the Venus effect is not specific to paintings by showing that it occurs in real life (Experiment 1) and in photographs (Experiments 1-4). The original description of the effect implied that observers describe Venus as seeing in a mirror what they (the observers) see. We used different photographs to compare the responses when the person in front of the mirror could or could not see him or herself and when the image of his or her face was or was not visible to the observer. Observers tend to state that a person can see his or her own reflection when he or she appears near a mirror, whether or not his or her face is visible in the mirror. A task based on a top-down view of a room confirmed that people lack sensitivity to the role of the viewpoint (Experiment 5). We discuss these findings in relation to other evidence of difficulty in understanding what is visible in a mirror.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, England. m.bertamini@liverpool.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20952791

Citation

Bertamini, Marco, et al. "The Venus Effect in Real Life and in Photographs." Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, vol. 72, no. 7, 2010, pp. 1948-64.
Bertamini M, Lawson R, Jones L, et al. The Venus effect in real life and in photographs. Atten Percept Psychophys. 2010;72(7):1948-64.
Bertamini, M., Lawson, R., Jones, L., & Winters, M. (2010). The Venus effect in real life and in photographs. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 72(7), 1948-64. https://doi.org/10.3758/APP.72.7.1948
Bertamini M, et al. The Venus Effect in Real Life and in Photographs. Atten Percept Psychophys. 2010;72(7):1948-64. PubMed PMID: 20952791.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Venus effect in real life and in photographs. AU - Bertamini,Marco, AU - Lawson,Rebecca, AU - Jones,Luke, AU - Winters,Madeline, PY - 2010/10/19/entrez PY - 2010/10/19/pubmed PY - 2011/4/16/medline SP - 1948 EP - 64 JF - Attention, perception & psychophysics JO - Atten Percept Psychophys VL - 72 IS - 7 N2 - The toilet of Venus is the subject of many paintings. Typically, Venus appears with a small mirror in which her face is visible. Observers tend to say that Venus is admiring herself in a mirror, even when the location of the mirror makes this impossible. We demonstrate that the Venus effect is not specific to paintings by showing that it occurs in real life (Experiment 1) and in photographs (Experiments 1-4). The original description of the effect implied that observers describe Venus as seeing in a mirror what they (the observers) see. We used different photographs to compare the responses when the person in front of the mirror could or could not see him or herself and when the image of his or her face was or was not visible to the observer. Observers tend to state that a person can see his or her own reflection when he or she appears near a mirror, whether or not his or her face is visible in the mirror. A task based on a top-down view of a room confirmed that people lack sensitivity to the role of the viewpoint (Experiment 5). We discuss these findings in relation to other evidence of difficulty in understanding what is visible in a mirror. SN - 1943-393X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20952791/The_Venus_effect_in_real_life_and_in_photographs_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -