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Situational awareness and health protective responses to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in Hong Kong: a cross-sectional study.
PLoS One. 2010 Oct 12; 5(10):e13350.Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Whether information sources influence health protective behaviours during influenza pandemics or other emerging infectious disease epidemics is uncertain.

METHODOLOGY

Data from cross-sectional telephone interviews of 1,001 Hong Kong adults in June, 2009 were tested against theory and data-derived hypothesized associations between trust in (formal/informal) information, understanding, self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility and worry, and hand hygiene and social distancing using Structural Equation Modelling with multigroup comparisons.

PRINCIPAL FINDINGS

Trust in formal (government/media) information about influenza was associated with greater reported understanding of A/H1N1 cause (β = 0.36) and A/H1N1 prevention self-efficacy (β = 0.25), which in turn were associated with more hand hygiene (β = 0.19 and β = 0.23, respectively). Trust in informal (interpersonal) information was negatively associated with perceived personal A/H1N1 susceptibility (β = -0.21), which was negatively associated with perceived self-efficacy (β = -0.42) but positively associated with influenza worry (β = 0.44). Trust in informal information was positively associated with influenza worry (β = 0.16) which was in turn associated with greater social distancing (β = 0.36). Multigroup comparisons showed gender differences regarding paths from trust in formal information to understanding of A/H1N1 cause, trust in informal information to understanding of A/H1N1 cause, and understanding of A/H1N1 cause to perceived self-efficacy.

CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE

Trust in government/media information was more strongly associated with greater self-efficacy and handwashing, whereas trust in informal information was strongly associated with perceived health threat and avoidance behaviour. Risk communication should consider the effect of gender differences.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Health Behaviour Research Group, Department of Community Medicine, School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20967280

Citation

Liao, Qiuyan, et al. "Situational Awareness and Health Protective Responses to Pandemic Influenza a (H1N1) in Hong Kong: a Cross-sectional Study." PloS One, vol. 5, no. 10, 2010, pp. e13350.
Liao Q, Cowling B, Lam WT, et al. Situational awareness and health protective responses to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in Hong Kong: a cross-sectional study. PLoS One. 2010;5(10):e13350.
Liao, Q., Cowling, B., Lam, W. T., Ng, M. W., & Fielding, R. (2010). Situational awareness and health protective responses to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in Hong Kong: a cross-sectional study. PloS One, 5(10), e13350. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0013350
Liao Q, et al. Situational Awareness and Health Protective Responses to Pandemic Influenza a (H1N1) in Hong Kong: a Cross-sectional Study. PLoS One. 2010 Oct 12;5(10):e13350. PubMed PMID: 20967280.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Situational awareness and health protective responses to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) in Hong Kong: a cross-sectional study. AU - Liao,Qiuyan, AU - Cowling,Benjamin, AU - Lam,Wing Tak, AU - Ng,Man Wai, AU - Fielding,Richard, Y1 - 2010/10/12/ PY - 2010/01/07/received PY - 2010/09/16/accepted PY - 2010/10/23/entrez PY - 2010/10/23/pubmed PY - 2011/3/8/medline SP - e13350 EP - e13350 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 5 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Whether information sources influence health protective behaviours during influenza pandemics or other emerging infectious disease epidemics is uncertain. METHODOLOGY: Data from cross-sectional telephone interviews of 1,001 Hong Kong adults in June, 2009 were tested against theory and data-derived hypothesized associations between trust in (formal/informal) information, understanding, self-efficacy, perceived susceptibility and worry, and hand hygiene and social distancing using Structural Equation Modelling with multigroup comparisons. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Trust in formal (government/media) information about influenza was associated with greater reported understanding of A/H1N1 cause (β = 0.36) and A/H1N1 prevention self-efficacy (β = 0.25), which in turn were associated with more hand hygiene (β = 0.19 and β = 0.23, respectively). Trust in informal (interpersonal) information was negatively associated with perceived personal A/H1N1 susceptibility (β = -0.21), which was negatively associated with perceived self-efficacy (β = -0.42) but positively associated with influenza worry (β = 0.44). Trust in informal information was positively associated with influenza worry (β = 0.16) which was in turn associated with greater social distancing (β = 0.36). Multigroup comparisons showed gender differences regarding paths from trust in formal information to understanding of A/H1N1 cause, trust in informal information to understanding of A/H1N1 cause, and understanding of A/H1N1 cause to perceived self-efficacy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Trust in government/media information was more strongly associated with greater self-efficacy and handwashing, whereas trust in informal information was strongly associated with perceived health threat and avoidance behaviour. Risk communication should consider the effect of gender differences. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20967280/Situational_awareness_and_health_protective_responses_to_pandemic_influenza_A__H1N1__in_Hong_Kong:_a_cross_sectional_study_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0013350 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -