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Soy food and isoflavone intake and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study.
Scand J Gastroenterol 2011; 46(2):165-72SJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

It has been suggested that soy food and isoflavone intake may be protective against the risk of colorectal cancer. However, epidemiologic evidence remains sparse and inconsistent. We addressed this issue in the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study.

MATERIAL AND METHODS

The study subjects were the 816 incident cases of histologically confirmed colorectal cancer and 815 community controls. Intakes of soy foods and isoflavones were assessed by in-person interview using a computer-assisted dietary method. Logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of colorectal cancer with adjustment for dietary intakes of calcium and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as for body mass index, physical activity, alcohol use, and other lifestyle factors.

RESULTS

Energy-adjusted intakes of soy foods (dry weight) and isoflavones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk in men and postmenopausal women, but not in premenopausal women. The multivariate-adjusted OR for the highest versus lowest quintile was 0.65 (95% CI 0.41-1.03, p for trend = 0.03) for soy foods and 0.68 (95% CI 0.42-1.10, p for trend = 0.051) for isoflavones in men. The corresponding values for postmenopausal women were 0.60 (95% CI 0.29-1.25, p for trend = 0.053) and 0.68 (95% CI 0.33-1.40, p for trend = 0.049). The site-specific analysis showed inverse associations of soy foods (p for trend = 0.007) and isoflavones (p for trend = 0.02) with rectal cancer in men.

CONCLUSION

The findings add to epidemiologic evidence for protective effects of soy foods and isoflavones in colorectal carcinogenesis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. sanjeev@phealth.med.kyushu-u.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20969489

Citation

Budhathoki, Sanjeev, et al. "Soy Food and Isoflavone Intake and Colorectal Cancer Risk: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study." Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 46, no. 2, 2011, pp. 165-72.
Budhathoki S, Joshi AM, Ohnaka K, et al. Soy food and isoflavone intake and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2011;46(2):165-72.
Budhathoki, S., Joshi, A. M., Ohnaka, K., Yin, G., Toyomura, K., Kono, S., ... Terasaka, R. (2011). Soy food and isoflavone intake and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study. Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, 46(2), pp. 165-72. doi:10.3109/00365521.2010.522720.
Budhathoki S, et al. Soy Food and Isoflavone Intake and Colorectal Cancer Risk: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study. Scand J Gastroenterol. 2011;46(2):165-72. PubMed PMID: 20969489.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Soy food and isoflavone intake and colorectal cancer risk: the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study. AU - Budhathoki,Sanjeev, AU - Joshi,Amit Man, AU - Ohnaka,Keizo, AU - Yin,Guang, AU - Toyomura,Kengo, AU - Kono,Suminori, AU - Mibu,Ryuichi, AU - Tanaka,Masao, AU - Kakeji,Yoshihiro, AU - Maehara,Yoshihiko, AU - Okamura,Takeshi, AU - Ikejiri,Koji, AU - Futami,Kitaroh, AU - Maekawa,Takafumi, AU - Yasunami,Yohichi, AU - Takenaka,Kenji, AU - Ichimiya,Hitoshi, AU - Terasaka,Reiji, Y1 - 2010/10/24/ PY - 2010/10/26/entrez PY - 2010/10/26/pubmed PY - 2011/6/8/medline SP - 165 EP - 72 JF - Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology JO - Scand. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 46 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: It has been suggested that soy food and isoflavone intake may be protective against the risk of colorectal cancer. However, epidemiologic evidence remains sparse and inconsistent. We addressed this issue in the Fukuoka Colorectal Cancer Study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study subjects were the 816 incident cases of histologically confirmed colorectal cancer and 815 community controls. Intakes of soy foods and isoflavones were assessed by in-person interview using a computer-assisted dietary method. Logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of colorectal cancer with adjustment for dietary intakes of calcium and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids as well as for body mass index, physical activity, alcohol use, and other lifestyle factors. RESULTS: Energy-adjusted intakes of soy foods (dry weight) and isoflavones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk in men and postmenopausal women, but not in premenopausal women. The multivariate-adjusted OR for the highest versus lowest quintile was 0.65 (95% CI 0.41-1.03, p for trend = 0.03) for soy foods and 0.68 (95% CI 0.42-1.10, p for trend = 0.051) for isoflavones in men. The corresponding values for postmenopausal women were 0.60 (95% CI 0.29-1.25, p for trend = 0.053) and 0.68 (95% CI 0.33-1.40, p for trend = 0.049). The site-specific analysis showed inverse associations of soy foods (p for trend = 0.007) and isoflavones (p for trend = 0.02) with rectal cancer in men. CONCLUSION: The findings add to epidemiologic evidence for protective effects of soy foods and isoflavones in colorectal carcinogenesis. SN - 1502-7708 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20969489/Soy_food_and_isoflavone_intake_and_colorectal_cancer_risk:_the_Fukuoka_Colorectal_Cancer_Study_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/00365521.2010.522720 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -