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Limaprost reduces motor disturbances by increasing the production of insulin-like growth factor I in rats subjected to spinal cord injury.
Transl Res. 2010 Nov; 156(5):292-301.TR

Abstract

Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) released from sensory neurons increases the production of a neuroprotective substance insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and sensory neuron stimulation contributes to a reduction of spinal cord injury (SCI) by inhibiting inflammatory responses in rats. Because receptors for prostaglandin E₂ (EP receptors) are present on sensory neurons, it is possible that prostaglandin E₁ analog limaprost reduces SCI by increasing IGF-I production through sensory neuron stimulation. We examined this possibility in rats subjected to compression-trauma-induced SCI. Limaprost increased the CGRP release from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons isolated from rats, and this increase was reversed by pretreatment with the EP4 receptor antagonist ONO-AE3-208. Spinal cord tissue levels of CGRP and IGF-I were increased after the induction of SCI, peaking at 2 h postinduction. The intravenous administration of limaprost enhanced increases of spinal cord tissue levels of CGRP, IGF-I, and IGF-I mRNA at 2 h after the induction of SCI. Increases of spinal cord tissue levels of tumor necrosis factor, caspase-3, myeloperoxidase, and the number of apoptotic nerve cells were inhibited by the administration of limaprost. Motor disturbances of hind legs in animals subjected to the compression-trauma-induced SCI were reduced by the administration of limaprost. These effects of limaprost were reversed completely by pretreatment with a specific transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 inhibitor SB366791 and by sensory denervation. These observations strongly suggest that limaprost may increase the IGF-I production by stimulating sensory neurons in the spinal cord, thereby ameliorating compression-trauma-induced SCI through attenuation of inflammatory responses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Emergency and Critical Care Medicine, School of Medicine, Fukuoka University, Fukuoka, Japan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20970752

Citation

Umemura, Takehiro, et al. "Limaprost Reduces Motor Disturbances By Increasing the Production of Insulin-like Growth Factor I in Rats Subjected to Spinal Cord Injury." Translational Research : the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine, vol. 156, no. 5, 2010, pp. 292-301.
Umemura T, Harada N, Kitamura T, et al. Limaprost reduces motor disturbances by increasing the production of insulin-like growth factor I in rats subjected to spinal cord injury. Transl Res. 2010;156(5):292-301.
Umemura, T., Harada, N., Kitamura, T., Ishikura, H., & Okajima, K. (2010). Limaprost reduces motor disturbances by increasing the production of insulin-like growth factor I in rats subjected to spinal cord injury. Translational Research : the Journal of Laboratory and Clinical Medicine, 156(5), 292-301. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trsl.2010.08.002
Umemura T, et al. Limaprost Reduces Motor Disturbances By Increasing the Production of Insulin-like Growth Factor I in Rats Subjected to Spinal Cord Injury. Transl Res. 2010;156(5):292-301. PubMed PMID: 20970752.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Limaprost reduces motor disturbances by increasing the production of insulin-like growth factor I in rats subjected to spinal cord injury. AU - Umemura,Takehiro, AU - Harada,Naoaki, AU - Kitamura,Taisuke, AU - Ishikura,Hiroyasu, AU - Okajima,Kenji, Y1 - 2010/09/08/ PY - 2010/02/02/received PY - 2010/08/11/revised PY - 2010/08/12/accepted PY - 2010/10/26/entrez PY - 2010/10/26/pubmed PY - 2010/11/10/medline SP - 292 EP - 301 JF - Translational research : the journal of laboratory and clinical medicine JO - Transl Res VL - 156 IS - 5 N2 - Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) released from sensory neurons increases the production of a neuroprotective substance insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), and sensory neuron stimulation contributes to a reduction of spinal cord injury (SCI) by inhibiting inflammatory responses in rats. Because receptors for prostaglandin E₂ (EP receptors) are present on sensory neurons, it is possible that prostaglandin E₁ analog limaprost reduces SCI by increasing IGF-I production through sensory neuron stimulation. We examined this possibility in rats subjected to compression-trauma-induced SCI. Limaprost increased the CGRP release from dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons isolated from rats, and this increase was reversed by pretreatment with the EP4 receptor antagonist ONO-AE3-208. Spinal cord tissue levels of CGRP and IGF-I were increased after the induction of SCI, peaking at 2 h postinduction. The intravenous administration of limaprost enhanced increases of spinal cord tissue levels of CGRP, IGF-I, and IGF-I mRNA at 2 h after the induction of SCI. Increases of spinal cord tissue levels of tumor necrosis factor, caspase-3, myeloperoxidase, and the number of apoptotic nerve cells were inhibited by the administration of limaprost. Motor disturbances of hind legs in animals subjected to the compression-trauma-induced SCI were reduced by the administration of limaprost. These effects of limaprost were reversed completely by pretreatment with a specific transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 inhibitor SB366791 and by sensory denervation. These observations strongly suggest that limaprost may increase the IGF-I production by stimulating sensory neurons in the spinal cord, thereby ameliorating compression-trauma-induced SCI through attenuation of inflammatory responses. SN - 1878-1810 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20970752/Limaprost_reduces_motor_disturbances_by_increasing_the_production_of_insulin_like_growth_factor_I_in_rats_subjected_to_spinal_cord_injury_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1931-5244(10)00180-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -