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Household income differences in food sources and food items purchased.
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2010 Oct 26; 7:77.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The present study examined income-related household food purchases among a sample of 90 households from the community.

METHODS

Annotated food purchase receipts were collected for a four-week period by the primary household shopper. Receipt food source and foods items were classified into specific categories, and food quantities in ounces were recorded by research staff. For home sources, a limited number of food/beverage categories were recorded. For eating out sources, all food/beverage items were recorded. Median monthly per person dollars spent and per person ounces purchased were computed. Food sources and food categories were examined by household income tertile.

SUBJECTS AND SETTING

A community-based sample of 90 households.

RESULTS

Higher income households spent significantly more dollars per person per month from both home and eating out sources compared with lower income households ($163 versus $100, p < .001). Compared with lower income households, higher income households spent significantly more home source dollars on both fruits/vegetables (21.5 versus 10.2, p < .001) and sweets/snacks (17.3 versus 8.3, p < .001), but did not differ on home dollars spent on sugar sweetened beverages (2.0 versus 1.7, p < .46). The proportion of home beverages that were sugar sweetened beverages was significantly higher among lower income households (45% versus 26%, p < .01). Within eating out sources, lower income households spent a significantly greater percent of dollars per person at carry out places (54% versus 37%, p < .01). No income differences were observed for dollars spent at discount grocery stores, small grocery stores or convenience stores.

CONCLUSIONS

Higher income households spent more money on both healthy and less healthy foods from a wide range of sources. Lower income households spent a larger proportion of their eating out dollars at carry out places, and a larger proportion of their home beverage purchases were sugar sweetened beverages.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Epidemiology & Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. frenc001@umn.edu.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20977738

Citation

French, Simone A., et al. "Household Income Differences in Food Sources and Food Items Purchased." The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, vol. 7, 2010, p. 77.
French SA, Wall M, Mitchell NR. Household income differences in food sources and food items purchased. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2010;7:77.
French, S. A., Wall, M., & Mitchell, N. R. (2010). Household income differences in food sources and food items purchased. The International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 7, 77. https://doi.org/10.1186/1479-5868-7-77
French SA, Wall M, Mitchell NR. Household Income Differences in Food Sources and Food Items Purchased. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2010 Oct 26;7:77. PubMed PMID: 20977738.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Household income differences in food sources and food items purchased. AU - French,Simone A, AU - Wall,Melanie, AU - Mitchell,Nathan R, Y1 - 2010/10/26/ PY - 2010/03/31/received PY - 2010/10/26/accepted PY - 2010/10/28/entrez PY - 2010/10/28/pubmed PY - 2010/10/28/medline SP - 77 EP - 77 JF - The international journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity JO - Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act VL - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: The present study examined income-related household food purchases among a sample of 90 households from the community. METHODS: Annotated food purchase receipts were collected for a four-week period by the primary household shopper. Receipt food source and foods items were classified into specific categories, and food quantities in ounces were recorded by research staff. For home sources, a limited number of food/beverage categories were recorded. For eating out sources, all food/beverage items were recorded. Median monthly per person dollars spent and per person ounces purchased were computed. Food sources and food categories were examined by household income tertile. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: A community-based sample of 90 households. RESULTS: Higher income households spent significantly more dollars per person per month from both home and eating out sources compared with lower income households ($163 versus $100, p < .001). Compared with lower income households, higher income households spent significantly more home source dollars on both fruits/vegetables (21.5 versus 10.2, p < .001) and sweets/snacks (17.3 versus 8.3, p < .001), but did not differ on home dollars spent on sugar sweetened beverages (2.0 versus 1.7, p < .46). The proportion of home beverages that were sugar sweetened beverages was significantly higher among lower income households (45% versus 26%, p < .01). Within eating out sources, lower income households spent a significantly greater percent of dollars per person at carry out places (54% versus 37%, p < .01). No income differences were observed for dollars spent at discount grocery stores, small grocery stores or convenience stores. CONCLUSIONS: Higher income households spent more money on both healthy and less healthy foods from a wide range of sources. Lower income households spent a larger proportion of their eating out dollars at carry out places, and a larger proportion of their home beverage purchases were sugar sweetened beverages. SN - 1479-5868 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20977738/Household_income_differences_in_food_sources_and_food_items_purchased_ L2 - https://ijbnpa.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1479-5868-7-77 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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