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Body mass, training, menses, and bone in adolescent runners: a 3-yr follow-up.
Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011 Jun; 43(6):959-66.MS

Abstract

Endurance runners with low bone mass during adolescence may risk attaining a low peak bone mineral density (BMD) in adulthood. Alternatively, they may mature late and undergo delayed bone mineral accumulation.

PURPOSE

The purpose of this study was to evaluate 40 adolescent runners (aged 15.9 ± 0.2 yr) at two time points, approximately 3 yr apart, to assess bone mass status and identify variables associated with bone mass change.

METHODS

Follow-up measures included a questionnaire to assess menstrual status, training, and sports participation history, height and weight, and a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan to assess total body, total hip, and lumbar spine BMD, bone mineral content (BMC), BMD z-score, and body composition. We used -1 and -2 BMD z-score cutoffs to categorize runners with low bone mass.

RESULTS

Eighty-seven percent of girls with low BMD at baseline had low BMD at the follow-up. Girls with low compared with normal baseline BMD had lower follow-up adjusted total body (2220.4 ± 65.8 vs 2793.1 ± 68.2 g, P < 0.001), total hip (27.0 ± 1 vs 33.9 ± 1.0 g, P < 0.05), and lumbar spine (47.8 ± 2.0 vs 66.3 ± 2.2 g, P < 0.001) BMC values. Variables related to 3-yr training volume, menstrual function, age, developmental stage, and change in body mass explained 29%-54% of the variability in BMC change.

CONCLUSIONS

The majority of adolescent runners with low BMD at baseline had low BMD after a 3-yr follow-up. Our observations suggest that "catch-up" accrual may be difficult and, thus, emphasize the importance of gaining adequate bone mineral during the early adolescent years.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Graduate Group in Nutritional Biology, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, USA. michellebarrack@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20980925

Citation

Barrack, Michelle T., et al. "Body Mass, Training, Menses, and Bone in Adolescent Runners: a 3-yr Follow-up." Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, vol. 43, no. 6, 2011, pp. 959-66.
Barrack MT, Van Loan MD, Rauh MJ, et al. Body mass, training, menses, and bone in adolescent runners: a 3-yr follow-up. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011;43(6):959-66.
Barrack, M. T., Van Loan, M. D., Rauh, M. J., & Nichols, J. F. (2011). Body mass, training, menses, and bone in adolescent runners: a 3-yr follow-up. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 43(6), 959-66. https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e318201d7bb
Barrack MT, et al. Body Mass, Training, Menses, and Bone in Adolescent Runners: a 3-yr Follow-up. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2011;43(6):959-66. PubMed PMID: 20980925.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass, training, menses, and bone in adolescent runners: a 3-yr follow-up. AU - Barrack,Michelle T, AU - Van Loan,Marta D, AU - Rauh,Mitchell J, AU - Nichols,Jeanne F, PY - 2010/10/29/entrez PY - 2010/10/29/pubmed PY - 2011/9/29/medline SP - 959 EP - 66 JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise JO - Med Sci Sports Exerc VL - 43 IS - 6 N2 - UNLABELLED: Endurance runners with low bone mass during adolescence may risk attaining a low peak bone mineral density (BMD) in adulthood. Alternatively, they may mature late and undergo delayed bone mineral accumulation. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate 40 adolescent runners (aged 15.9 ± 0.2 yr) at two time points, approximately 3 yr apart, to assess bone mass status and identify variables associated with bone mass change. METHODS: Follow-up measures included a questionnaire to assess menstrual status, training, and sports participation history, height and weight, and a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan to assess total body, total hip, and lumbar spine BMD, bone mineral content (BMC), BMD z-score, and body composition. We used -1 and -2 BMD z-score cutoffs to categorize runners with low bone mass. RESULTS: Eighty-seven percent of girls with low BMD at baseline had low BMD at the follow-up. Girls with low compared with normal baseline BMD had lower follow-up adjusted total body (2220.4 ± 65.8 vs 2793.1 ± 68.2 g, P < 0.001), total hip (27.0 ± 1 vs 33.9 ± 1.0 g, P < 0.05), and lumbar spine (47.8 ± 2.0 vs 66.3 ± 2.2 g, P < 0.001) BMC values. Variables related to 3-yr training volume, menstrual function, age, developmental stage, and change in body mass explained 29%-54% of the variability in BMC change. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of adolescent runners with low BMD at baseline had low BMD after a 3-yr follow-up. Our observations suggest that "catch-up" accrual may be difficult and, thus, emphasize the importance of gaining adequate bone mineral during the early adolescent years. SN - 1530-0315 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20980925/Body_mass_training_menses_and_bone_in_adolescent_runners:_a_3_yr_follow_up_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1249/MSS.0b013e318201d7bb DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -