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Maternal stress, physical activity, and body mass index during new mothers' first year postpartum.
Women Health 2010; 50(6):544-62WH

Abstract

We evaluated associations of parenting stress, including depressive symptoms, with 51 first-time mothers' light and moderate physical activity and body mass index during the first year postpartum. The Parenting Stress Index and 24-hour physical activity recalls were completed during the first year postpartum (mean time elapsed since birth: 6 months). Direct relationships between identified variables were tested, and then hierarchical linear regression was used to assess hypothesized relationships among body mass index, physical activity, and parenting stress. Effects of parenting stress on the relationships between postpartum body mass index, light physical activity, and moderate physical activity were evaluated after controlling for factors known to be associated with overweight and low levels of physical activity in women. Mean postpartum body mass index = 27.4 kg/m² ± 7.7, range = 18-50 kg/m². Mean reported hours of light physical activity = 11.2 ± 3.0, and moderate physical activity = 4.5 ± 3.0 per day. Postpartum body mass index was not associated with parenting stress, but was positively related to higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (r = .89, p < .01) and light physical activity (r = .32, p < .05), and was negatively related to moderate physical activity (r = -25, p < .08). Higher postpartum body mass index (β = .27, p < .05), less concern regarding parenting competence (β = -.95, p < .001), and more depressive symptoms (β = .66, p < .01) were associated with more light physical activity (R² = .48, p < .001). More moderate physical activity (R² = .45, p < .001) was associated with lower postpartum body mass index (β = -.27, p < .05), more concern about parenting competence (β = 1.0, p < .001), and less depressive symptoms (β = -.68, p < .01). Higher postpartum body mass index (R² = .89, p < .001) was associated with higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (β = .99, p < .001), more pregnancy weight gain (β = .22, p < .001), less attachment (β = -.68, p < .01), and less social isolation (β = -.13, p < .02). These data suggest that interventions that target parenting stress and depressive symptoms in addition to physical activity are needed to prevent development of overweight in new mothers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Georgia Prevention Institute, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta, Georgia 30912, USA. mvernon@mcg.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20981636

Citation

Vernon, Marlo M., et al. "Maternal Stress, Physical Activity, and Body Mass Index During New Mothers' First Year Postpartum." Women & Health, vol. 50, no. 6, 2010, pp. 544-62.
Vernon MM, Young-Hyman D, Looney SW. Maternal stress, physical activity, and body mass index during new mothers' first year postpartum. Women Health. 2010;50(6):544-62.
Vernon, M. M., Young-Hyman, D., & Looney, S. W. (2010). Maternal stress, physical activity, and body mass index during new mothers' first year postpartum. Women & Health, 50(6), pp. 544-62. doi:10.1080/03630242.2010.516692.
Vernon MM, Young-Hyman D, Looney SW. Maternal Stress, Physical Activity, and Body Mass Index During New Mothers' First Year Postpartum. Women Health. 2010;50(6):544-62. PubMed PMID: 20981636.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal stress, physical activity, and body mass index during new mothers' first year postpartum. AU - Vernon,Marlo M, AU - Young-Hyman,Deborah, AU - Looney,Stephen W, PY - 2010/10/29/entrez PY - 2010/10/29/pubmed PY - 2011/1/5/medline SP - 544 EP - 62 JF - Women & health JO - Women Health VL - 50 IS - 6 N2 - We evaluated associations of parenting stress, including depressive symptoms, with 51 first-time mothers' light and moderate physical activity and body mass index during the first year postpartum. The Parenting Stress Index and 24-hour physical activity recalls were completed during the first year postpartum (mean time elapsed since birth: 6 months). Direct relationships between identified variables were tested, and then hierarchical linear regression was used to assess hypothesized relationships among body mass index, physical activity, and parenting stress. Effects of parenting stress on the relationships between postpartum body mass index, light physical activity, and moderate physical activity were evaluated after controlling for factors known to be associated with overweight and low levels of physical activity in women. Mean postpartum body mass index = 27.4 kg/m² ± 7.7, range = 18-50 kg/m². Mean reported hours of light physical activity = 11.2 ± 3.0, and moderate physical activity = 4.5 ± 3.0 per day. Postpartum body mass index was not associated with parenting stress, but was positively related to higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (r = .89, p < .01) and light physical activity (r = .32, p < .05), and was negatively related to moderate physical activity (r = -25, p < .08). Higher postpartum body mass index (β = .27, p < .05), less concern regarding parenting competence (β = -.95, p < .001), and more depressive symptoms (β = .66, p < .01) were associated with more light physical activity (R² = .48, p < .001). More moderate physical activity (R² = .45, p < .001) was associated with lower postpartum body mass index (β = -.27, p < .05), more concern about parenting competence (β = 1.0, p < .001), and less depressive symptoms (β = -.68, p < .01). Higher postpartum body mass index (R² = .89, p < .001) was associated with higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (β = .99, p < .001), more pregnancy weight gain (β = .22, p < .001), less attachment (β = -.68, p < .01), and less social isolation (β = -.13, p < .02). These data suggest that interventions that target parenting stress and depressive symptoms in addition to physical activity are needed to prevent development of overweight in new mothers. SN - 1541-0331 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20981636/Maternal_stress_physical_activity_and_body_mass_index_during_new_mothers'_first_year_postpartum_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03630242.2010.516692 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -