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Papillary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: a clinicopathologic series.
Am J Otolaryngol 2011 Nov-Dec; 32(6):557-63AJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

Papillary squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC) is a rare malignancy that has been associated with human papillomavirus. We present all cases of this disease at a single academic teaching hospital over the last 30 years.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

A retrospective chart review was performed for all patients with a diagnosis of PSCC. Of 65 patients identified, 52 were included after meeting established diagnostic criteria. Chart reviews were performed for patient demographics, overall survival, and disease-free survival.

RESULTS

Mean age at diagnosis was 65 years, with a male to female ratio of 2.3:1. The majority of lesions (n = 34, 65.4%) arose in areas commonly affected by benign squamous papillomas, with the laryngopharynx the most commonly affected (n = 19, 36.5%), followed by the oral cavity (n = 18, 34.6%), sinonasal tract (n = 8, 15.4%), and oropharynx (n = 7, 13.5%). Two- and 5-year disease-free survival rate was 68% and 46%, respectively. Overall survival rate was 90% and 72% at 2 and 5 years, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Papillary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is a distinct variant of conventional squamous cell carcinoma with a good prognosis despite high locoregional recurrence rates. Histology and subsite localization corroborate existing evidence that human papillomavirus may be involved.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21035908

Citation

Russell, Jonathon O., et al. "Papillary Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: a Clinicopathologic Series." American Journal of Otolaryngology, vol. 32, no. 6, 2011, pp. 557-63.
Russell JO, Hoschar AP, Scharpf J. Papillary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: a clinicopathologic series. Am J Otolaryngol. 2011;32(6):557-63.
Russell, J. O., Hoschar, A. P., & Scharpf, J. (2011). Papillary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: a clinicopathologic series. American Journal of Otolaryngology, 32(6), pp. 557-63. doi:10.1016/j.amjoto.2010.09.010.
Russell JO, Hoschar AP, Scharpf J. Papillary Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: a Clinicopathologic Series. Am J Otolaryngol. 2011;32(6):557-63. PubMed PMID: 21035908.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Papillary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: a clinicopathologic series. AU - Russell,Jonathon O, AU - Hoschar,Aaron P, AU - Scharpf,Joseph, Y1 - 2010/10/29/ PY - 2010/07/30/received PY - 2010/09/10/accepted PY - 2010/11/2/entrez PY - 2010/11/3/pubmed PY - 2012/3/23/medline SP - 557 EP - 63 JF - American journal of otolaryngology JO - Am J Otolaryngol VL - 32 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: Papillary squamous cell carcinoma (PSCC) is a rare malignancy that has been associated with human papillomavirus. We present all cases of this disease at a single academic teaching hospital over the last 30 years. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed for all patients with a diagnosis of PSCC. Of 65 patients identified, 52 were included after meeting established diagnostic criteria. Chart reviews were performed for patient demographics, overall survival, and disease-free survival. RESULTS: Mean age at diagnosis was 65 years, with a male to female ratio of 2.3:1. The majority of lesions (n = 34, 65.4%) arose in areas commonly affected by benign squamous papillomas, with the laryngopharynx the most commonly affected (n = 19, 36.5%), followed by the oral cavity (n = 18, 34.6%), sinonasal tract (n = 8, 15.4%), and oropharynx (n = 7, 13.5%). Two- and 5-year disease-free survival rate was 68% and 46%, respectively. Overall survival rate was 90% and 72% at 2 and 5 years, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Papillary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck is a distinct variant of conventional squamous cell carcinoma with a good prognosis despite high locoregional recurrence rates. Histology and subsite localization corroborate existing evidence that human papillomavirus may be involved. SN - 1532-818X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21035908/Papillary_squamous_cell_carcinoma_of_the_head_and_neck:_a_clinicopathologic_series_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0196-0709(10)00185-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -