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Lipsosomal amphotericin B for treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2010 Nov; 83(5):1028-33.AJ

Abstract

Treatment options for cutaneous leishmaniasis in the United States are problematic because the available products are either investigational, toxic, and/or of questionable effectiveness. A retrospective review of patients receiving liposomal amphotericin B through the Walter Reed Army Medical Center for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis during 2007-2009 was conducted. Twenty patients who acquired disease in five countries and with five different strains of Leishmania were treated, of whom 19 received a full course of treatment. Sixteen (84%) of 19 experienced a cure with the initial treatment regimen. Three patients did not fully heal after an initial treatment course, but were cured with additional dosing. Acute infusion-related reactions occurred in 25% and mild renal toxicity occurred in 45% of patients. Although the optimum dosing regimen is undefined and the cost and toxicity may limit widespread use, liposomal amphotericin B is a viable treatment alternative for cutaneous leishmaniasis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Infectious Diseases Service, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia 20307, USA. glenn.wortmann@us.army.milNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21036832

Citation

Wortmann, Glenn, et al. "Lipsosomal Amphotericin B for Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 83, no. 5, 2010, pp. 1028-33.
Wortmann G, Zapor M, Ressner R, et al. Lipsosomal amphotericin B for treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2010;83(5):1028-33.
Wortmann, G., Zapor, M., Ressner, R., Fraser, S., Hartzell, J., Pierson, J., Weintrob, A., & Magill, A. (2010). Lipsosomal amphotericin B for treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 83(5), 1028-33. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.2010.10-0171
Wortmann G, et al. Lipsosomal Amphotericin B for Treatment of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2010;83(5):1028-33. PubMed PMID: 21036832.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lipsosomal amphotericin B for treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis. AU - Wortmann,Glenn, AU - Zapor,Michael, AU - Ressner,Roseanne, AU - Fraser,Susan, AU - Hartzell,Josh, AU - Pierson,Joseph, AU - Weintrob,Amy, AU - Magill,Alan, PY - 2010/11/2/entrez PY - 2010/11/3/pubmed PY - 2010/12/14/medline SP - 1028 EP - 33 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am J Trop Med Hyg VL - 83 IS - 5 N2 - Treatment options for cutaneous leishmaniasis in the United States are problematic because the available products are either investigational, toxic, and/or of questionable effectiveness. A retrospective review of patients receiving liposomal amphotericin B through the Walter Reed Army Medical Center for the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis during 2007-2009 was conducted. Twenty patients who acquired disease in five countries and with five different strains of Leishmania were treated, of whom 19 received a full course of treatment. Sixteen (84%) of 19 experienced a cure with the initial treatment regimen. Three patients did not fully heal after an initial treatment course, but were cured with additional dosing. Acute infusion-related reactions occurred in 25% and mild renal toxicity occurred in 45% of patients. Although the optimum dosing regimen is undefined and the cost and toxicity may limit widespread use, liposomal amphotericin B is a viable treatment alternative for cutaneous leishmaniasis. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21036832/Lipsosomal_amphotericin_B_for_treatment_of_cutaneous_leishmaniasis_ L2 - https://ajtmh.org/doi/10.4269/ajtmh.2010.10-0171 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -