Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Pediatric mass critical care in a pandemic.
Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2012 Jan; 13(1):e1-4.PC

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Previous simulation studies suggest that temporary pediatric mass critical care approaches would accommodate plausible hypothetical sudden-impact public health emergencies. However, the utility of sustained pediatric mass critical care responses in prolonged pandemics has not been evaluated. The objective of this study was to compare the ability of a typical region to serve pediatric intensive care unit needs in hypothetical pandemics, with and without mass critical care responses sufficient to triple usual pediatric intensive care unit capacity. DESIGN, SETTING, PATIENTS, AND INTERVENTIONS: The Monte Carlo simulation method was used to model responses to hypothetical pandemics on the basis of national historical evidence regarding pediatric intensive care unit admission and length of stay in pandemic and nonpandemic circumstances. Assuming all ages are affected equally, federal guidelines call for plans to serve moderate and severe pandemics requiring pediatric intensive care unit care for 457 and 5,277 infants and children per million of the population, respectively.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS

A moderate pandemic would exceed ordinary surge capacity on 13% of pandemic season days but would always be accommodated by mass critical care approaches. In a severe pandemic, ordinary surge methods would accommodate all the patients on only 32% of pandemic season days and would accommodate 39% of needed patient days. Mass critical care approaches would accommodate all the patients on 82% of the days and would accommodate 64% of all patient days.

CONCLUSION

Mass critical care approaches would be essential to extend care to the majority of infants and children in a severe pandemic. However, some patients needing critical care still could not be accommodated, requiring consideration of rationing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA. kanterr@upstate.edu

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21037504

Citation

Kanter, Robert K.. "Pediatric Mass Critical Care in a Pandemic." Pediatric Critical Care Medicine : a Journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies, vol. 13, no. 1, 2012, pp. e1-4.
Kanter RK. Pediatric mass critical care in a pandemic. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2012;13(1):e1-4.
Kanter, R. K. (2012). Pediatric mass critical care in a pandemic. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine : a Journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies, 13(1), e1-4. https://doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0b013e3181fe390a
Kanter RK. Pediatric Mass Critical Care in a Pandemic. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2012;13(1):e1-4. PubMed PMID: 21037504.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Pediatric mass critical care in a pandemic. A1 - Kanter,Robert K, PY - 2010/11/2/entrez PY - 2010/11/3/pubmed PY - 2012/5/10/medline SP - e1 EP - 4 JF - Pediatric critical care medicine : a journal of the Society of Critical Care Medicine and the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies JO - Pediatr Crit Care Med VL - 13 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Previous simulation studies suggest that temporary pediatric mass critical care approaches would accommodate plausible hypothetical sudden-impact public health emergencies. However, the utility of sustained pediatric mass critical care responses in prolonged pandemics has not been evaluated. The objective of this study was to compare the ability of a typical region to serve pediatric intensive care unit needs in hypothetical pandemics, with and without mass critical care responses sufficient to triple usual pediatric intensive care unit capacity. DESIGN, SETTING, PATIENTS, AND INTERVENTIONS: The Monte Carlo simulation method was used to model responses to hypothetical pandemics on the basis of national historical evidence regarding pediatric intensive care unit admission and length of stay in pandemic and nonpandemic circumstances. Assuming all ages are affected equally, federal guidelines call for plans to serve moderate and severe pandemics requiring pediatric intensive care unit care for 457 and 5,277 infants and children per million of the population, respectively. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A moderate pandemic would exceed ordinary surge capacity on 13% of pandemic season days but would always be accommodated by mass critical care approaches. In a severe pandemic, ordinary surge methods would accommodate all the patients on only 32% of pandemic season days and would accommodate 39% of needed patient days. Mass critical care approaches would accommodate all the patients on 82% of the days and would accommodate 64% of all patient days. CONCLUSION: Mass critical care approaches would be essential to extend care to the majority of infants and children in a severe pandemic. However, some patients needing critical care still could not be accommodated, requiring consideration of rationing. SN - 1529-7535 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21037504/Pediatric_mass_critical_care_in_a_pandemic_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0b013e3181fe390a DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -