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Do breakfast skipping and breakfast type affect energy intake, nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality in young adults? NHANES 1999-2002.
J Am Coll Nutr. 2010 Aug; 29(4):407-18.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the impact of breakfast skipping and type of breakfast consumed on energy/nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional.

SETTING

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2002.

SUBJECTS

Young adults (20-39 years, n = 2615).

MEASURES

A 24-hour dietary recall was used, with breakfast defined as self-reported. Covariate-adjusted sample-weighted means for the entire day's energy/nutrient intakes, mean adequacy ratio (MAR) for nutrient intakes, and diet quality (i.e., Healthy Eating Index [HEI]-2005) scores were compared using analysis of variance and Bonferroni's correction (p < 0.0167) among breakfast skippers (BS), ready-to-eat-cereal breakfast consumers (RTECC), and other breakfast consumers (OBC). Energy/nutrient intakes and food consumption at breakfast were also compared (p ≤ 0.05).

RESULTS

Twenty-five percent of young adults were BS, 16.5% were RTECC, and 58.4% were OBC. Intakes of total energy, percent energy from carbohydrate, and dietary fiber were higher in RTECC than in BS and OBC. Percent energy intake from added sugars was higher in BS than in RTECC and OBC. Compared with BS and RTECC, OBC consumed a lower percent energy from carbohydrates and total sugars, but consumed a higher percent energy from total fat and discretionary solid fats and had a higher cholesterol intake. Intakes of several micronutrients were higher in RTECC than in BS and OBC. Both MAR and total HEI scores were the highest in RTECC and higher in OBC than in BS. The HEI scores for intakes of whole fruits, total/whole grains, milk, and percent energy from solid fat/alcohol/added sugar were the highest in RTECC and higher in OBC than in BS. Compared with OBC, RTECC had a higher HEI score for the intake of saturated fat. At breakfast, RTECC consumed higher intakes of total fruits, whole grains, dairy products, carbohydrates and total sugars, dietary fiber, and several micronutrients than OBC, who consumed higher intakes of meat/poultry/fish, eggs, total fat, discretionary oils/solid fats, cholesterol, and sodium than RTECC.

CONCLUSION

Thus, RTECC had more favorable nutrient intakes and better diet quality than BS and OBC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Children's Nutrition Research Center, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030-2600, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21041816

Citation

Deshmukh-Taskar, Priya R., et al. "Do Breakfast Skipping and Breakfast Type Affect Energy Intake, Nutrient Intake, Nutrient Adequacy, and Diet Quality in Young Adults? NHANES 1999-2002." Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 29, no. 4, 2010, pp. 407-18.
Deshmukh-Taskar PR, Radcliffe JD, Liu Y, et al. Do breakfast skipping and breakfast type affect energy intake, nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality in young adults? NHANES 1999-2002. J Am Coll Nutr. 2010;29(4):407-18.
Deshmukh-Taskar, P. R., Radcliffe, J. D., Liu, Y., & Nicklas, T. A. (2010). Do breakfast skipping and breakfast type affect energy intake, nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality in young adults? NHANES 1999-2002. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 29(4), 407-18.
Deshmukh-Taskar PR, et al. Do Breakfast Skipping and Breakfast Type Affect Energy Intake, Nutrient Intake, Nutrient Adequacy, and Diet Quality in Young Adults? NHANES 1999-2002. J Am Coll Nutr. 2010;29(4):407-18. PubMed PMID: 21041816.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Do breakfast skipping and breakfast type affect energy intake, nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality in young adults? NHANES 1999-2002. AU - Deshmukh-Taskar,Priya R, AU - Radcliffe,John D, AU - Liu,Yan, AU - Nicklas,Theresa A, PY - 2010/11/3/entrez PY - 2010/11/3/pubmed PY - 2011/3/30/medline SP - 407 EP - 18 JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition JO - J Am Coll Nutr VL - 29 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of breakfast skipping and type of breakfast consumed on energy/nutrient intake, nutrient adequacy, and diet quality. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2002. SUBJECTS: Young adults (20-39 years, n = 2615). MEASURES: A 24-hour dietary recall was used, with breakfast defined as self-reported. Covariate-adjusted sample-weighted means for the entire day's energy/nutrient intakes, mean adequacy ratio (MAR) for nutrient intakes, and diet quality (i.e., Healthy Eating Index [HEI]-2005) scores were compared using analysis of variance and Bonferroni's correction (p < 0.0167) among breakfast skippers (BS), ready-to-eat-cereal breakfast consumers (RTECC), and other breakfast consumers (OBC). Energy/nutrient intakes and food consumption at breakfast were also compared (p ≤ 0.05). RESULTS: Twenty-five percent of young adults were BS, 16.5% were RTECC, and 58.4% were OBC. Intakes of total energy, percent energy from carbohydrate, and dietary fiber were higher in RTECC than in BS and OBC. Percent energy intake from added sugars was higher in BS than in RTECC and OBC. Compared with BS and RTECC, OBC consumed a lower percent energy from carbohydrates and total sugars, but consumed a higher percent energy from total fat and discretionary solid fats and had a higher cholesterol intake. Intakes of several micronutrients were higher in RTECC than in BS and OBC. Both MAR and total HEI scores were the highest in RTECC and higher in OBC than in BS. The HEI scores for intakes of whole fruits, total/whole grains, milk, and percent energy from solid fat/alcohol/added sugar were the highest in RTECC and higher in OBC than in BS. Compared with OBC, RTECC had a higher HEI score for the intake of saturated fat. At breakfast, RTECC consumed higher intakes of total fruits, whole grains, dairy products, carbohydrates and total sugars, dietary fiber, and several micronutrients than OBC, who consumed higher intakes of meat/poultry/fish, eggs, total fat, discretionary oils/solid fats, cholesterol, and sodium than RTECC. CONCLUSION: Thus, RTECC had more favorable nutrient intakes and better diet quality than BS and OBC. SN - 1541-1087 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21041816/Do_breakfast_skipping_and_breakfast_type_affect_energy_intake_nutrient_intake_nutrient_adequacy_and_diet_quality_in_young_adults_NHANES_1999_2002_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.2010.10719858 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -