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Negative intergroup contact makes group memberships salient: explaining why intergroup conflict endures.
Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2010 Dec; 36(12):1723-38.PS

Abstract

Drawing from the intergroup contact model and self-categorization theory, the authors advanced the novel hypothesis of a valence-salience effect, whereby negative contact causes higher category salience than positive contact. As predicted, in a laboratory experiment of interethnic contact, White Australians (N = 49) made more frequent and earlier reference to ethnicity when describing their ethnic contact partner if she had displayed negative (vs. positive, neutral) nonverbal behavior. In a two-wave experimental study of retrieved intergenerational contact, American young adults (N = 240) reported age to be more salient during negative (vs. positive) contact and negative contact predicted increased episodic and chronic category salience over time. Some evidence for the reverse salience-valence effect was also found. Because category salience facilitates contact generalization, these results suggest that intergroup contact is potentially biased toward worsening intergroup relations; further implications for theory and policy making are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia. Stefania.Paolini@Newcastle.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21051766

Citation

Paolini, Stefania, et al. "Negative Intergroup Contact Makes Group Memberships Salient: Explaining Why Intergroup Conflict Endures." Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, vol. 36, no. 12, 2010, pp. 1723-38.
Paolini S, Harwood J, Rubin M. Negative intergroup contact makes group memberships salient: explaining why intergroup conflict endures. Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2010;36(12):1723-38.
Paolini, S., Harwood, J., & Rubin, M. (2010). Negative intergroup contact makes group memberships salient: explaining why intergroup conflict endures. Personality & Social Psychology Bulletin, 36(12), 1723-38. https://doi.org/10.1177/0146167210388667
Paolini S, Harwood J, Rubin M. Negative Intergroup Contact Makes Group Memberships Salient: Explaining Why Intergroup Conflict Endures. Pers Soc Psychol Bull. 2010;36(12):1723-38. PubMed PMID: 21051766.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Negative intergroup contact makes group memberships salient: explaining why intergroup conflict endures. AU - Paolini,Stefania, AU - Harwood,Jake, AU - Rubin,Mark, Y1 - 2010/11/04/ PY - 2010/11/6/entrez PY - 2010/11/6/pubmed PY - 2011/2/17/medline SP - 1723 EP - 38 JF - Personality & social psychology bulletin JO - Pers Soc Psychol Bull VL - 36 IS - 12 N2 - Drawing from the intergroup contact model and self-categorization theory, the authors advanced the novel hypothesis of a valence-salience effect, whereby negative contact causes higher category salience than positive contact. As predicted, in a laboratory experiment of interethnic contact, White Australians (N = 49) made more frequent and earlier reference to ethnicity when describing their ethnic contact partner if she had displayed negative (vs. positive, neutral) nonverbal behavior. In a two-wave experimental study of retrieved intergenerational contact, American young adults (N = 240) reported age to be more salient during negative (vs. positive) contact and negative contact predicted increased episodic and chronic category salience over time. Some evidence for the reverse salience-valence effect was also found. Because category salience facilitates contact generalization, these results suggest that intergroup contact is potentially biased toward worsening intergroup relations; further implications for theory and policy making are discussed. SN - 1552-7433 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21051766/Negative_intergroup_contact_makes_group_memberships_salient:_explaining_why_intergroup_conflict_endures_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0146167210388667?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -