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Drug use and conflict in inner-city African-American relationships in the 2000s.
J Psychoactive Drugs. 2010 Sep; 42(3):327-37.JP

Abstract

Inner-city relationships face numerous challenges including illegal drug use and its consequences. The nature of this challenge, however, has changed dramatically with a shift from the crack subculture of the 1980s and early 1990s to the subsequent marijuana/blunts subculture. This study presents data concerning 95 inner-city relationships where illegal drug use was present from people who were interviewed in 2004-2006 and reinterviewed in 2008. Hard drug use was still problematic in the 2000s even with the passing of the crack epidemic and its associated behavioral norms. Hard drug (primarily crack) users reported drug use was a problem, reported conflict over drugs, reported higher levels of conflict than others and were the most likely to have broken up with their partner. On the other hand, the experiences and subcultural norms associated with marijuana use appeared to be much less detrimental to relationship harmony. Subjects who used marijuana but not hard drugs reported much less relationship conflict. Indeed, many reported that they enjoyed using marijuana with their partner. These subcultural insights further the understanding that young adults have constructed a much more socially productive subculture regarding marijuana use than their predecessors had constructed around use of crack.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Development and Research Institutes, Inc., 47 Prospect Pkwy, Burlington, VT 05401, USA. Andrew.Golub@BurlingtonTelecom.NetNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21053755

Citation

Golub, Andrew, et al. "Drug Use and Conflict in Inner-city African-American Relationships in the 2000s." Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, vol. 42, no. 3, 2010, pp. 327-37.
Golub A, Dunlap E, Benoit E. Drug use and conflict in inner-city African-American relationships in the 2000s. J Psychoactive Drugs. 2010;42(3):327-37.
Golub, A., Dunlap, E., & Benoit, E. (2010). Drug use and conflict in inner-city African-American relationships in the 2000s. Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 42(3), 327-37.
Golub A, Dunlap E, Benoit E. Drug Use and Conflict in Inner-city African-American Relationships in the 2000s. J Psychoactive Drugs. 2010;42(3):327-37. PubMed PMID: 21053755.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Drug use and conflict in inner-city African-American relationships in the 2000s. AU - Golub,Andrew, AU - Dunlap,Eloise, AU - Benoit,Ellen, PY - 2010/11/9/entrez PY - 2010/11/9/pubmed PY - 2010/12/14/medline SP - 327 EP - 37 JF - Journal of psychoactive drugs JO - J Psychoactive Drugs VL - 42 IS - 3 N2 - Inner-city relationships face numerous challenges including illegal drug use and its consequences. The nature of this challenge, however, has changed dramatically with a shift from the crack subculture of the 1980s and early 1990s to the subsequent marijuana/blunts subculture. This study presents data concerning 95 inner-city relationships where illegal drug use was present from people who were interviewed in 2004-2006 and reinterviewed in 2008. Hard drug use was still problematic in the 2000s even with the passing of the crack epidemic and its associated behavioral norms. Hard drug (primarily crack) users reported drug use was a problem, reported conflict over drugs, reported higher levels of conflict than others and were the most likely to have broken up with their partner. On the other hand, the experiences and subcultural norms associated with marijuana use appeared to be much less detrimental to relationship harmony. Subjects who used marijuana but not hard drugs reported much less relationship conflict. Indeed, many reported that they enjoyed using marijuana with their partner. These subcultural insights further the understanding that young adults have constructed a much more socially productive subculture regarding marijuana use than their predecessors had constructed around use of crack. SN - 0279-1072 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21053755/Drug_use_and_conflict_in_inner_city_African_American_relationships_in_the_2000s_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02791072.2010.10400695 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -