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Influenza vaccine responses in older adults.
Ageing Res Rev. 2011 Jul; 10(3):379-88.AR

Abstract

The most profound consequences of immune senescence with respect to public health are the increased susceptibility to influenza and loss of efficacy of the current split-virus influenza vaccines in older adults, which are otherwise very effective in younger populations. Influenza infection is associated with high rates of complicated illness including pneumonia, heart attacks and strokes in the 65+ population. Changes in both innate and adaptive immune function not only converge in the reduced response to vaccination and protection against influenza, but present significant challenges to new vaccine development. In older adults, the goal of vaccination is more realistically targeted to providing clinical protection against disease rather sterilizing immunity. Correlates of clinical protection may not be measured using standard techniques such as antibody titres to predict vaccine efficacy. Further, antibody responses to vaccination as a correlate of protection may fail to detect important changes in cellular immunity and enhanced vaccine-mediated protection against influenza illness in older people. This article will discuss the impact of influenza in older adults, immunologic targets for improved efficacy of the vaccines, and alternative correlates of clinical protection against influenza that are needed for more effective translation of novel vaccination strategies to improved protection against influenza in older adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Janet.McElhaney@ubc.ca

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21055484

Citation

McElhaney, Janet E.. "Influenza Vaccine Responses in Older Adults." Ageing Research Reviews, vol. 10, no. 3, 2011, pp. 379-88.
McElhaney JE. Influenza vaccine responses in older adults. Ageing Res Rev. 2011;10(3):379-88.
McElhaney, J. E. (2011). Influenza vaccine responses in older adults. Ageing Research Reviews, 10(3), 379-88. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.arr.2010.10.008
McElhaney JE. Influenza Vaccine Responses in Older Adults. Ageing Res Rev. 2011;10(3):379-88. PubMed PMID: 21055484.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influenza vaccine responses in older adults. A1 - McElhaney,Janet E, Y1 - 2010/11/03/ PY - 2010/06/08/received PY - 2010/10/19/revised PY - 2010/10/22/accepted PY - 2010/11/9/entrez PY - 2010/11/9/pubmed PY - 2011/9/16/medline SP - 379 EP - 88 JF - Ageing research reviews JO - Ageing Res Rev VL - 10 IS - 3 N2 - The most profound consequences of immune senescence with respect to public health are the increased susceptibility to influenza and loss of efficacy of the current split-virus influenza vaccines in older adults, which are otherwise very effective in younger populations. Influenza infection is associated with high rates of complicated illness including pneumonia, heart attacks and strokes in the 65+ population. Changes in both innate and adaptive immune function not only converge in the reduced response to vaccination and protection against influenza, but present significant challenges to new vaccine development. In older adults, the goal of vaccination is more realistically targeted to providing clinical protection against disease rather sterilizing immunity. Correlates of clinical protection may not be measured using standard techniques such as antibody titres to predict vaccine efficacy. Further, antibody responses to vaccination as a correlate of protection may fail to detect important changes in cellular immunity and enhanced vaccine-mediated protection against influenza illness in older people. This article will discuss the impact of influenza in older adults, immunologic targets for improved efficacy of the vaccines, and alternative correlates of clinical protection against influenza that are needed for more effective translation of novel vaccination strategies to improved protection against influenza in older adults. SN - 1872-9649 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21055484/Influenza_vaccine_responses_in_older_adults_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1568-1637(10)00109-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -