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Gaze behavior predicts memory bias for angry facial expressions in stable dysphoria.
Emotion. 2010 Dec; 10(6):894-902.E

Abstract

Interpersonal theories suggest that depressed individuals are sensitive to signs of interpersonal rejection, such as angry facial expressions. The present study examined memory bias for happy, sad, angry, and neutral facial expressions in stably dysphoric and stably nondysphoric young adults. Participants' gaze behavior (i.e., fixation duration, number of fixations, and distance between fixations) while viewing these facial expressions was also assessed. Using signal detection analyses, the dysphoric group had better accuracy on a surprise recognition task for angry faces than the nondysphoric group. Further, mediation analyses indicated that greater breadth of attentional focus (i.e., distance between fixations) accounted for enhanced recall of angry faces among the dysphoric group. There were no differences between dysphoria groups in gaze behavior or memory for sad, happy, or neutral facial expressions. Findings from this study identify a specific cognitive mechanism (i.e., breadth of attentional focus) that accounts for biased recall of angry facial expressions in dysphoria. This work also highlights the potential for integrating cognitive and interpersonal theories of depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21058844

Citation

Wells, Tony T., et al. "Gaze Behavior Predicts Memory Bias for Angry Facial Expressions in Stable Dysphoria." Emotion (Washington, D.C.), vol. 10, no. 6, 2010, pp. 894-902.
Wells TT, Beevers CG, Robison AE, et al. Gaze behavior predicts memory bias for angry facial expressions in stable dysphoria. Emotion. 2010;10(6):894-902.
Wells, T. T., Beevers, C. G., Robison, A. E., & Ellis, A. J. (2010). Gaze behavior predicts memory bias for angry facial expressions in stable dysphoria. Emotion (Washington, D.C.), 10(6), 894-902. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0020022
Wells TT, et al. Gaze Behavior Predicts Memory Bias for Angry Facial Expressions in Stable Dysphoria. Emotion. 2010;10(6):894-902. PubMed PMID: 21058844.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Gaze behavior predicts memory bias for angry facial expressions in stable dysphoria. AU - Wells,Tony T, AU - Beevers,Christopher G, AU - Robison,Adrienne E, AU - Ellis,Alissa J, PY - 2010/11/10/entrez PY - 2010/11/10/pubmed PY - 2011/3/26/medline SP - 894 EP - 902 JF - Emotion (Washington, D.C.) JO - Emotion VL - 10 IS - 6 N2 - Interpersonal theories suggest that depressed individuals are sensitive to signs of interpersonal rejection, such as angry facial expressions. The present study examined memory bias for happy, sad, angry, and neutral facial expressions in stably dysphoric and stably nondysphoric young adults. Participants' gaze behavior (i.e., fixation duration, number of fixations, and distance between fixations) while viewing these facial expressions was also assessed. Using signal detection analyses, the dysphoric group had better accuracy on a surprise recognition task for angry faces than the nondysphoric group. Further, mediation analyses indicated that greater breadth of attentional focus (i.e., distance between fixations) accounted for enhanced recall of angry faces among the dysphoric group. There were no differences between dysphoria groups in gaze behavior or memory for sad, happy, or neutral facial expressions. Findings from this study identify a specific cognitive mechanism (i.e., breadth of attentional focus) that accounts for biased recall of angry facial expressions in dysphoria. This work also highlights the potential for integrating cognitive and interpersonal theories of depression. SN - 1931-1516 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21058844/Gaze_behavior_predicts_memory_bias_for_angry_facial_expressions_in_stable_dysphoria_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/emo/10/6/894 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -