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Self-cross-linked polymer nanogels: a versatile nanoscopic drug delivery platform.
J Am Chem Soc. 2010 Dec 08; 132(48):17227-35.JA

Abstract

Nanoscopic vehicles that stably encapsulate drug molecules and release them in response to a specific trigger are of great interest due to implications in therapeutic applications, especially for cancer therapy. For this purpose, we have synthesized highly stable polymeric nanogels, in which the kinetics of guest molecule release can be fine-tuned by control over cross-linking density. The polymer nanogel precursor is based on a random copolymer that contains oligoethyleneglycol (OEG) and pyridyldisulfide (PDS) units as side-chain functionalities. By introducing variations into the precursor polymer, such as molecular weight and the relative percentages of hydrophilic OEG units and hydrophobic PDS functionalities, we have achieved significant control over nanogel size. We show that the noncovalently encapsulated guest molecules can be released in response to a redox trigger, glutathione (GSH). Stability of dye encapsulation inside the nanogels and tunability in the release of guest molecules have been demonstrated through in vitro fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments. We show in vitro doxorubicin delivery into breast cancer cells (MCF-7) with nanogels of different cross-linking density to demonstrate that it plays a key role in the stable encapsulation of hydrophobic drug molecules and the cell-uptake efficiencies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21077674

Citation

Ryu, Ja-Hyoung, et al. "Self-cross-linked Polymer Nanogels: a Versatile Nanoscopic Drug Delivery Platform." Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 132, no. 48, 2010, pp. 17227-35.
Ryu JH, Chacko RT, Jiwpanich S, et al. Self-cross-linked polymer nanogels: a versatile nanoscopic drug delivery platform. J Am Chem Soc. 2010;132(48):17227-35.
Ryu, J. H., Chacko, R. T., Jiwpanich, S., Bickerton, S., Babu, R. P., & Thayumanavan, S. (2010). Self-cross-linked polymer nanogels: a versatile nanoscopic drug delivery platform. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 132(48), 17227-35. https://doi.org/10.1021/ja1069932
Ryu JH, et al. Self-cross-linked Polymer Nanogels: a Versatile Nanoscopic Drug Delivery Platform. J Am Chem Soc. 2010 Dec 8;132(48):17227-35. PubMed PMID: 21077674.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-cross-linked polymer nanogels: a versatile nanoscopic drug delivery platform. AU - Ryu,Ja-Hyoung, AU - Chacko,Reuben T, AU - Jiwpanich,Siriporn, AU - Bickerton,Sean, AU - Babu,R Prakash, AU - Thayumanavan,S, Y1 - 2010/11/15/ PY - 2010/11/17/entrez PY - 2010/11/17/pubmed PY - 2013/9/5/medline SP - 17227 EP - 35 JF - Journal of the American Chemical Society JO - J. Am. Chem. Soc. VL - 132 IS - 48 N2 - Nanoscopic vehicles that stably encapsulate drug molecules and release them in response to a specific trigger are of great interest due to implications in therapeutic applications, especially for cancer therapy. For this purpose, we have synthesized highly stable polymeric nanogels, in which the kinetics of guest molecule release can be fine-tuned by control over cross-linking density. The polymer nanogel precursor is based on a random copolymer that contains oligoethyleneglycol (OEG) and pyridyldisulfide (PDS) units as side-chain functionalities. By introducing variations into the precursor polymer, such as molecular weight and the relative percentages of hydrophilic OEG units and hydrophobic PDS functionalities, we have achieved significant control over nanogel size. We show that the noncovalently encapsulated guest molecules can be released in response to a redox trigger, glutathione (GSH). Stability of dye encapsulation inside the nanogels and tunability in the release of guest molecules have been demonstrated through in vitro fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments. We show in vitro doxorubicin delivery into breast cancer cells (MCF-7) with nanogels of different cross-linking density to demonstrate that it plays a key role in the stable encapsulation of hydrophobic drug molecules and the cell-uptake efficiencies. SN - 1520-5126 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21077674/Self_cross_linked_polymer_nanogels:_a_versatile_nanoscopic_drug_delivery_platform_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1021/ja1069932 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -