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Long-term statin use and the risk of gallstone disease: A population-based case-control study.
Am J Epidemiol 2011; 173(2):162-70AJ

Abstract

Most gallstones originate from cholesterol-supersaturated bile. Statins inhibit hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis and therefore may reduce the risk of gallstone disease. Population-based evidence, however, is sparse. Thus, the authors conducted a population-based case-control study using medical databases from northern Denmark (1.7 million inhabitants) to identify 32,494 cases of gallstones occurring between 1996 and 2008 and to identify age-, sex-, and county-matched population controls for each case. Cases and their matched controls who were exposed to lipid-lowering drugs were categorized as current users if their last prescription was redeemed ≤90 days before the case's diagnosis date; otherwise, they were categorized as former users. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for gallstone disease in patients treated with lipid-lowering drugs. In current users, the adjusted odds ratios associating statin use with the occurrence of gallstone disease were 1.17 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.30) for those who had 1-4 prescriptions, 0.89 (95% CI: 0.80, 0.97) for those who had 5-19 prescriptions, and 0.76 (95% CI: 0.69, 0.84) for those who had ≥20 total prescriptions. In former users, the corresponding adjusted odds ratios were 1.24 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.39), 0.97 (95% CI: 0.86, 1.10), and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.97), respectively. The use of other lipid-lowering drugs showed no similar association.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. re@dce.au.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21084557

Citation

Erichsen, Rune, et al. "Long-term Statin Use and the Risk of Gallstone Disease: a Population-based Case-control Study." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 173, no. 2, 2011, pp. 162-70.
Erichsen R, Frøslev T, Lash TL, et al. Long-term statin use and the risk of gallstone disease: A population-based case-control study. Am J Epidemiol. 2011;173(2):162-70.
Erichsen, R., Frøslev, T., Lash, T. L., Pedersen, L., & Sørensen, H. T. (2011). Long-term statin use and the risk of gallstone disease: A population-based case-control study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 173(2), pp. 162-70. doi:10.1093/aje/kwq361.
Erichsen R, et al. Long-term Statin Use and the Risk of Gallstone Disease: a Population-based Case-control Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2011 Jan 15;173(2):162-70. PubMed PMID: 21084557.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term statin use and the risk of gallstone disease: A population-based case-control study. AU - Erichsen,Rune, AU - Frøslev,Trine, AU - Lash,Timothy L, AU - Pedersen,Lars, AU - Sørensen,Henrik Toft, Y1 - 2010/11/17/ PY - 2010/11/19/entrez PY - 2010/11/19/pubmed PY - 2011/1/22/medline SP - 162 EP - 70 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 173 IS - 2 N2 - Most gallstones originate from cholesterol-supersaturated bile. Statins inhibit hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis and therefore may reduce the risk of gallstone disease. Population-based evidence, however, is sparse. Thus, the authors conducted a population-based case-control study using medical databases from northern Denmark (1.7 million inhabitants) to identify 32,494 cases of gallstones occurring between 1996 and 2008 and to identify age-, sex-, and county-matched population controls for each case. Cases and their matched controls who were exposed to lipid-lowering drugs were categorized as current users if their last prescription was redeemed ≤90 days before the case's diagnosis date; otherwise, they were categorized as former users. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for gallstone disease in patients treated with lipid-lowering drugs. In current users, the adjusted odds ratios associating statin use with the occurrence of gallstone disease were 1.17 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.30) for those who had 1-4 prescriptions, 0.89 (95% CI: 0.80, 0.97) for those who had 5-19 prescriptions, and 0.76 (95% CI: 0.69, 0.84) for those who had ≥20 total prescriptions. In former users, the corresponding adjusted odds ratios were 1.24 (95% CI: 1.11, 1.39), 0.97 (95% CI: 0.86, 1.10), and 0.79 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.97), respectively. The use of other lipid-lowering drugs showed no similar association. SN - 1476-6256 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21084557/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwq361 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -