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PD168077, a D(4) receptor agonist, reverses object recognition deficits in rats: potential role for D(4) receptor mechanisms in improving cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia.
J Psychopharmacol. 2011 Jun; 25(6):792-800.JP

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of the dopamine D(4) receptor agonist, PD168077, on recognition memory using a novel object recognition task, which detects disruption and improvement of recognition memory in rats by measuring their ability to discriminate between familiar and novel objects. When acquisition and test were 6 h apart (experiment 1), control rats failed to discriminate between familiar and novel objects at test. Rats given low doses of PD168077 (0.3; 1.0 mg/kg) also failed to discriminate between the objects, while rats given higher doses (3.0; 10.0 mg/kg) explored the novel object more than the familiar object, indicating retained memory of the familiar object. Thus, at higher doses, PD168077 improved recognition memory in rats. Experiment 2 tested whether PD168077 would attenuate deficits in novel object recognition induced by sub-chronic phencyclidine. Testing was 1 min after acquisition, such that vehicle pre-treated rats differentiated between the novel and familiar objects: however, sub-chronic phencyclidine-treated rats failed to discriminate between the two, indicating disruption of recognition memory. PD168077 (10 mg/kg) restored the ability of phencyclidine-treated rats to differentiate between the novel and familiar objects, indicating improved recognition memory. The results suggest that D(4) receptor activation can improve cognitive dysfunction in an animal model relevant to schizophrenia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21088042

Citation

Sood, Pooja, et al. "PD168077, a D(4) Receptor Agonist, Reverses Object Recognition Deficits in Rats: Potential Role for D(4) Receptor Mechanisms in Improving Cognitive Dysfunction in Schizophrenia." Journal of Psychopharmacology (Oxford, England), vol. 25, no. 6, 2011, pp. 792-800.
Sood P, Idris NF, Cole S, et al. PD168077, a D(4) receptor agonist, reverses object recognition deficits in rats: potential role for D(4) receptor mechanisms in improving cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. J Psychopharmacol. 2011;25(6):792-800.
Sood, P., Idris, N. F., Cole, S., Grayson, B., Neill, J. C., & Young, A. M. (2011). PD168077, a D(4) receptor agonist, reverses object recognition deficits in rats: potential role for D(4) receptor mechanisms in improving cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. Journal of Psychopharmacology (Oxford, England), 25(6), 792-800. https://doi.org/10.1177/0269881110387840
Sood P, et al. PD168077, a D(4) Receptor Agonist, Reverses Object Recognition Deficits in Rats: Potential Role for D(4) Receptor Mechanisms in Improving Cognitive Dysfunction in Schizophrenia. J Psychopharmacol. 2011;25(6):792-800. PubMed PMID: 21088042.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - PD168077, a D(4) receptor agonist, reverses object recognition deficits in rats: potential role for D(4) receptor mechanisms in improving cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. AU - Sood,Pooja, AU - Idris,Nagi F, AU - Cole,Susan, AU - Grayson,Ben, AU - Neill,Joanna C, AU - Young,Andrew M J, Y1 - 2010/11/18/ PY - 2010/11/20/entrez PY - 2010/11/23/pubmed PY - 2011/9/29/medline SP - 792 EP - 800 JF - Journal of psychopharmacology (Oxford, England) JO - J Psychopharmacol VL - 25 IS - 6 N2 - This study investigated the effects of the dopamine D(4) receptor agonist, PD168077, on recognition memory using a novel object recognition task, which detects disruption and improvement of recognition memory in rats by measuring their ability to discriminate between familiar and novel objects. When acquisition and test were 6 h apart (experiment 1), control rats failed to discriminate between familiar and novel objects at test. Rats given low doses of PD168077 (0.3; 1.0 mg/kg) also failed to discriminate between the objects, while rats given higher doses (3.0; 10.0 mg/kg) explored the novel object more than the familiar object, indicating retained memory of the familiar object. Thus, at higher doses, PD168077 improved recognition memory in rats. Experiment 2 tested whether PD168077 would attenuate deficits in novel object recognition induced by sub-chronic phencyclidine. Testing was 1 min after acquisition, such that vehicle pre-treated rats differentiated between the novel and familiar objects: however, sub-chronic phencyclidine-treated rats failed to discriminate between the two, indicating disruption of recognition memory. PD168077 (10 mg/kg) restored the ability of phencyclidine-treated rats to differentiate between the novel and familiar objects, indicating improved recognition memory. The results suggest that D(4) receptor activation can improve cognitive dysfunction in an animal model relevant to schizophrenia. SN - 1461-7285 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21088042/PD168077_a_D_4__receptor_agonist_reverses_object_recognition_deficits_in_rats:_potential_role_for_D_4__receptor_mechanisms_in_improving_cognitive_dysfunction_in_schizophrenia_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0269881110387840?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -