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Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer: an update.

Abstract

Pancreatic cancer, although infrequent, has a very poor prognosis, making it one of the 4 or 5 most common causes of cancer mortality in developed countries. Its incidence varies greatly across regions, which suggests that lifestyle factors such as diet, and environmental factors, such as vitamin D exposure, play a role. Because pancreatic cancer is strongly age-dependent, increasing population longevity and ageing will lead to an increase of the global burden of pancreatic cancer in the coming decades. Smoking is the most common known risk factor, causing 20-25% of all pancreatic tumors. Although a common cause of pancreatitis, heavy alcohol intake is associated only with a modest increased risk of pancreatic cancer. While viruses do not represent a major risk factor, people infected with Helicobacter pylori appeared to be at high risk of pancreatic cancer. Many factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, including overweight and obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, and long-standing diabetes also increase the risk disease, while atopic allergy and use of metformin as a treatment for diabetes have been associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer is associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer and it is estimated that 5-10% of patients with pancreatic cancer have an underlying germline disorder. Having a non-O blood group, another inherited characteristic, has also been steadily associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. While many risk factors for pancreatic cancer are not modifiable, adopting a healthy lifestyle could substantially reduce pancreatic cancer risk.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. patrick.maisonneuve@ieo.it

    Source

    MeSH

    Genetic Predisposition to Disease
    Humans
    Incidence
    Pancreatic Neoplasms
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    21088417

    Citation

    Maisonneuve, Patrick, and Albert B. Lowenfels. "Epidemiology of Pancreatic Cancer: an Update." Digestive Diseases (Basel, Switzerland), vol. 28, no. 4-5, 2010, pp. 645-56.
    Maisonneuve P, Lowenfels AB. Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer: an update. Dig Dis. 2010;28(4-5):645-56.
    Maisonneuve, P., & Lowenfels, A. B. (2010). Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer: an update. Digestive Diseases (Basel, Switzerland), 28(4-5), pp. 645-56. doi:10.1159/000320068.
    Maisonneuve P, Lowenfels AB. Epidemiology of Pancreatic Cancer: an Update. Dig Dis. 2010;28(4-5):645-56. PubMed PMID: 21088417.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer: an update. AU - Maisonneuve,Patrick, AU - Lowenfels,Albert B, Y1 - 2010/11/18/ PY - 2010/11/20/entrez PY - 2010/11/20/pubmed PY - 2011/3/12/medline SP - 645 EP - 56 JF - Digestive diseases (Basel, Switzerland) JO - Dig Dis VL - 28 IS - 4-5 N2 - Pancreatic cancer, although infrequent, has a very poor prognosis, making it one of the 4 or 5 most common causes of cancer mortality in developed countries. Its incidence varies greatly across regions, which suggests that lifestyle factors such as diet, and environmental factors, such as vitamin D exposure, play a role. Because pancreatic cancer is strongly age-dependent, increasing population longevity and ageing will lead to an increase of the global burden of pancreatic cancer in the coming decades. Smoking is the most common known risk factor, causing 20-25% of all pancreatic tumors. Although a common cause of pancreatitis, heavy alcohol intake is associated only with a modest increased risk of pancreatic cancer. While viruses do not represent a major risk factor, people infected with Helicobacter pylori appeared to be at high risk of pancreatic cancer. Many factors associated with the metabolic syndrome, including overweight and obesity, impaired glucose tolerance, and long-standing diabetes also increase the risk disease, while atopic allergy and use of metformin as a treatment for diabetes have been associated with a reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer is associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer and it is estimated that 5-10% of patients with pancreatic cancer have an underlying germline disorder. Having a non-O blood group, another inherited characteristic, has also been steadily associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. While many risk factors for pancreatic cancer are not modifiable, adopting a healthy lifestyle could substantially reduce pancreatic cancer risk. SN - 1421-9875 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21088417/Epidemiology_of_pancreatic_cancer:_an_update_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000320068 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -