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[Treatment of Alzheimer's disease: the current situation?].

Abstract

Current evidence tends to support the notion that Alzheimer's disease may be postponed by implementing interventions toward the potential etiologic factors (both risk and protective factors) (i.e., primary prevention) and by early detection (i.e., secondary prevention). Epidemiologic research has provided sufficient evidence that vascular risk factors in middle-aged and older adults play a significant role in the development and progression of dementia and AD, whereas extensive social network and active engagement in mental, social, and physical activities may postpone the onset of the dementing disorder. The tertiary prevention may help stabilize cognitive functions, reduce agitation, control neuropsychiatric symptoms. This tertiary prevention aims to avoid functional disability, and if possible, to improve quality of life for patients with AD. Cognitive training may help maintain cognitive function, slow down cognitive decline, and improve wellbeing for people with mild dementia. Current pharmacological treatment widely used for AD and dementia, including cholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor antagonist (memantine), psychotropic medications are designed to target clinical symptoms of the disease such as cognitive and neuropsychiatric disturbances.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Service de Neurologie, C.H.U. de Charleroi. jean.jacquy@chu-charleroi.be

Source

Revue medicale de Bruxelles 31:4 2010 Sep pg 357-62

MeSH

Alzheimer Disease
Humans
Mental Disorders

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

fre

PubMed ID

21089415

Citation

Jacquy, J. "[Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease: the Current Situation?]." Revue Medicale De Bruxelles, vol. 31, no. 4, 2010, pp. 357-62.
Jacquy J. [Treatment of Alzheimer's disease: the current situation?]. Rev Med Brux. 2010;31(4):357-62.
Jacquy, J. (2010). [Treatment of Alzheimer's disease: the current situation?]. Revue Medicale De Bruxelles, 31(4), pp. 357-62.
Jacquy J. [Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease: the Current Situation?]. Rev Med Brux. 2010;31(4):357-62. PubMed PMID: 21089415.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Treatment of Alzheimer's disease: the current situation?]. A1 - Jacquy,J, PY - 2010/11/25/entrez PY - 2010/11/26/pubmed PY - 2011/1/7/medline SP - 357 EP - 62 JF - Revue medicale de Bruxelles JO - Rev Med Brux VL - 31 IS - 4 N2 - Current evidence tends to support the notion that Alzheimer's disease may be postponed by implementing interventions toward the potential etiologic factors (both risk and protective factors) (i.e., primary prevention) and by early detection (i.e., secondary prevention). Epidemiologic research has provided sufficient evidence that vascular risk factors in middle-aged and older adults play a significant role in the development and progression of dementia and AD, whereas extensive social network and active engagement in mental, social, and physical activities may postpone the onset of the dementing disorder. The tertiary prevention may help stabilize cognitive functions, reduce agitation, control neuropsychiatric symptoms. This tertiary prevention aims to avoid functional disability, and if possible, to improve quality of life for patients with AD. Cognitive training may help maintain cognitive function, slow down cognitive decline, and improve wellbeing for people with mild dementia. Current pharmacological treatment widely used for AD and dementia, including cholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine) and the N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor antagonist (memantine), psychotropic medications are designed to target clinical symptoms of the disease such as cognitive and neuropsychiatric disturbances. SN - 0035-3639 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21089415/[Treatment_of_Alzheimer's_disease:_the_current_situation]_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/alzheimersdisease.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -