Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effects of aerobic and resistance training on hemoglobin A1c levels in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial.
JAMA 2010; 304(20):2253-62JAMA

Abstract

CONTEXT

Exercise guidelines for individuals with diabetes include both aerobic and resistance training although few studies have directly examined this exercise combination.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the benefits of aerobic training alone, resistance training alone, and a combination of both on hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) in individuals with type 2 diabetes.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS

A randomized controlled trial in which 262 sedentary men and women in Louisiana with type 2 diabetes and HbA(1c) levels of 6.5% or higher were enrolled in the 9-month exercise program between April 2007 and August 2009.

INTERVENTION

Forty-one participants were assigned to the nonexercise control group, 73 to resistance training 3 days a week, 72 to aerobic exercise in which they expended 12 kcal/kg per week; and 76 to combined aerobic and resistance training in which they expended 10 kcal/kg per week and engaged in resistance training twice a week. Main Outcome Change in HbA(1c) level. Secondary outcomes included measures of anthropometry and fitness.

RESULTS

The study included 63.0% women and 47.3% nonwhite participants who were a mean (SD) age of 55.8 years (8.7 years) with a baseline HbA(1c) level of 7.7% (1.0%). Compared with the control group, the absolute mean change in HbA(1c) in the combination training exercise group was -0.34% (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.64% to -0.03%; P = .03). The mean changes in HbA(1c) were not statistically significant in either the resistance training (-0.16%; 95% CI, -0.46% to 0.15%; P = .32) or the aerobic (-0.24%; 95% CI, -0.55% to 0.07%; P = .14) groups compared with the control group. Only the combination exercise group improved maximum oxygen consumption (mean, 1.0 mL/kg per min; 95% CI, 0.5-1.5, P < .05) compared with the control group. All exercise groups reduced waist circumference from -1.9 to -2.8 cm compared with the control group. The resistance training group lost a mean of -1.4 kg fat mass (95% CI, -2.0 to -0.7 kg; P < .05) and combination training group lost a mean of -1.7 (-2.3 to -1.1 kg; P < .05) compared with the control group.

CONCLUSIONS

Among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a combination of aerobic and resistance training compared with the nonexercise control group improved HbA(1c) levels. This was not achieved by aerobic or resistance training alone.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00458133.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Louisiana State University System, 6400 Perkins Rd, Baton Rouge, LA 70808-4124, USA. tim.church@pbrc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21098771

Citation

Church, Timothy S., et al. "Effects of Aerobic and Resistance Training On Hemoglobin A1c Levels in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: a Randomized Controlled Trial." JAMA, vol. 304, no. 20, 2010, pp. 2253-62.
Church TS, Blair SN, Cocreham S, et al. Effects of aerobic and resistance training on hemoglobin A1c levels in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2010;304(20):2253-62.
Church, T. S., Blair, S. N., Cocreham, S., Johannsen, N., Johnson, W., Kramer, K., ... Earnest, C. P. (2010). Effects of aerobic and resistance training on hemoglobin A1c levels in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA, 304(20), pp. 2253-62. doi:10.1001/jama.2010.1710.
Church TS, et al. Effects of Aerobic and Resistance Training On Hemoglobin A1c Levels in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: a Randomized Controlled Trial. JAMA. 2010 Nov 24;304(20):2253-62. PubMed PMID: 21098771.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of aerobic and resistance training on hemoglobin A1c levels in patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Church,Timothy S, AU - Blair,Steven N, AU - Cocreham,Shannon, AU - Johannsen,Neil, AU - Johnson,William, AU - Kramer,Kimberly, AU - Mikus,Catherine R, AU - Myers,Valerie, AU - Nauta,Melissa, AU - Rodarte,Ruben Q, AU - Sparks,Lauren, AU - Thompson,Angela, AU - Earnest,Conrad P, PY - 2010/11/25/entrez PY - 2010/11/26/pubmed PY - 2010/12/14/medline SP - 2253 EP - 62 JF - JAMA JO - JAMA VL - 304 IS - 20 N2 - CONTEXT: Exercise guidelines for individuals with diabetes include both aerobic and resistance training although few studies have directly examined this exercise combination. OBJECTIVE: To examine the benefits of aerobic training alone, resistance training alone, and a combination of both on hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) in individuals with type 2 diabetes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A randomized controlled trial in which 262 sedentary men and women in Louisiana with type 2 diabetes and HbA(1c) levels of 6.5% or higher were enrolled in the 9-month exercise program between April 2007 and August 2009. INTERVENTION: Forty-one participants were assigned to the nonexercise control group, 73 to resistance training 3 days a week, 72 to aerobic exercise in which they expended 12 kcal/kg per week; and 76 to combined aerobic and resistance training in which they expended 10 kcal/kg per week and engaged in resistance training twice a week. Main Outcome Change in HbA(1c) level. Secondary outcomes included measures of anthropometry and fitness. RESULTS: The study included 63.0% women and 47.3% nonwhite participants who were a mean (SD) age of 55.8 years (8.7 years) with a baseline HbA(1c) level of 7.7% (1.0%). Compared with the control group, the absolute mean change in HbA(1c) in the combination training exercise group was -0.34% (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.64% to -0.03%; P = .03). The mean changes in HbA(1c) were not statistically significant in either the resistance training (-0.16%; 95% CI, -0.46% to 0.15%; P = .32) or the aerobic (-0.24%; 95% CI, -0.55% to 0.07%; P = .14) groups compared with the control group. Only the combination exercise group improved maximum oxygen consumption (mean, 1.0 mL/kg per min; 95% CI, 0.5-1.5, P < .05) compared with the control group. All exercise groups reduced waist circumference from -1.9 to -2.8 cm compared with the control group. The resistance training group lost a mean of -1.4 kg fat mass (95% CI, -2.0 to -0.7 kg; P < .05) and combination training group lost a mean of -1.7 (-2.3 to -1.1 kg; P < .05) compared with the control group. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, a combination of aerobic and resistance training compared with the nonexercise control group improved HbA(1c) levels. This was not achieved by aerobic or resistance training alone. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00458133. SN - 1538-3598 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21098771/Effects_of_aerobic_and_resistance_training_on_hemoglobin_A1c_levels_in_patients_with_type_2_diabetes:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/10.1001/jama.2010.1710 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -