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Aripiprazole augmentation in 39 adolescents with medication-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder.
J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2010 Dec; 30(6):688-93.JC

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation of serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) treatment in adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) who did not respond to 2 initial trials with SRI monotherapy. A consecutive series of 39 adolescents (28 males and 11 females; age range, 12 to 18 years; mean age, 14.6 ± 1.2 years), with OCD diagnosed based on a clinical interview and according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria, were included. The mean final aripiprazole dosage was 12.2 ± 3.4 mg/d. At the endpoint, 27 patients (59.0%) had a Clinical Global Impression (CGI)-Improvement score 1 or 2 (very much or much improved) and a Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) score 3 or below and were thus considered responders. The CGI-S improved from 6.0 ± 0.9 at the baseline (severely to extremely severely ill) to 3.5 ± 1.0 (mild to moderately ill) at the end of the follow-up (P < 0.0001), whereas the Children's Global Assessment Scale improved from 39.2 ± 5.8 to 49.8 ± 9.0 (P < 0.0001). Compared with nonresponders, responders were less impaired at the baseline in functional impairment (Children's Global Assessment Scale; P = 0.004) but not in clinical severity (CGI-S). Subtypes of OCD comorbidity and absence of insight did not affect clinical response. Mild transitory agitation (10.3%), mild sedation (10.3%), and sleep disorders (7.7%) were reported, but any of the patients discontinued medication because of adverse effects.In these severely impaired adolescents, aripiprazole augmentation of SRIs was well tolerated and effective in more than half of the patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

IRCCS Stella Maris, Scientific Institute of Child Neurology and Psychiatry, Via dei Giacinti 2, 56018 Calambrone, Pisa, Italy. gabriele.masi@inpe.unipi.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21105283

Citation

Masi, Gabriele, et al. "Aripiprazole Augmentation in 39 Adolescents With Medication-resistant Obsessive-compulsive Disorder." Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, vol. 30, no. 6, 2010, pp. 688-93.
Masi G, Pfanner C, Millepiedi S, et al. Aripiprazole augmentation in 39 adolescents with medication-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2010;30(6):688-93.
Masi, G., Pfanner, C., Millepiedi, S., & Berloffa, S. (2010). Aripiprazole augmentation in 39 adolescents with medication-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 30(6), 688-93.
Masi G, et al. Aripiprazole Augmentation in 39 Adolescents With Medication-resistant Obsessive-compulsive Disorder. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2010;30(6):688-93. PubMed PMID: 21105283.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Aripiprazole augmentation in 39 adolescents with medication-resistant obsessive-compulsive disorder. AU - Masi,Gabriele, AU - Pfanner,Chiara, AU - Millepiedi,Stefania, AU - Berloffa,Stefano, PY - 2010/11/25/entrez PY - 2010/11/26/pubmed PY - 2011/2/23/medline SP - 688 EP - 93 JF - Journal of clinical psychopharmacology JO - J Clin Psychopharmacol VL - 30 IS - 6 N2 - The aim of this study was to assess efficacy of aripiprazole augmentation of serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SRI) treatment in adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) who did not respond to 2 initial trials with SRI monotherapy. A consecutive series of 39 adolescents (28 males and 11 females; age range, 12 to 18 years; mean age, 14.6 ± 1.2 years), with OCD diagnosed based on a clinical interview and according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria, were included. The mean final aripiprazole dosage was 12.2 ± 3.4 mg/d. At the endpoint, 27 patients (59.0%) had a Clinical Global Impression (CGI)-Improvement score 1 or 2 (very much or much improved) and a Clinical Global Impression-Severity (CGI-S) score 3 or below and were thus considered responders. The CGI-S improved from 6.0 ± 0.9 at the baseline (severely to extremely severely ill) to 3.5 ± 1.0 (mild to moderately ill) at the end of the follow-up (P < 0.0001), whereas the Children's Global Assessment Scale improved from 39.2 ± 5.8 to 49.8 ± 9.0 (P < 0.0001). Compared with nonresponders, responders were less impaired at the baseline in functional impairment (Children's Global Assessment Scale; P = 0.004) but not in clinical severity (CGI-S). Subtypes of OCD comorbidity and absence of insight did not affect clinical response. Mild transitory agitation (10.3%), mild sedation (10.3%), and sleep disorders (7.7%) were reported, but any of the patients discontinued medication because of adverse effects.In these severely impaired adolescents, aripiprazole augmentation of SRIs was well tolerated and effective in more than half of the patients. SN - 1533-712X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21105283/Aripiprazole_augmentation_in_39_adolescents_with_medication_resistant_obsessive_compulsive_disorder_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/jcp.0b013e3181fab7b1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -