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Therapy for nystagmus.
J Neuroophthalmol. 2010 Dec; 30(4):361-71.JN

Abstract

Pathological forms of nystagmus and their visual consequences can be treated using pharmacological, optical, and surgical approaches. Acquired periodic alternating nystagmus improves following treatment with baclofen, and downbeat nystagmus may improve following treatment with aminopyridines. Gabapentin and memantine are helpful in reducing acquired pendular nystagmus due to multiple sclerosis. Ocular oscillations in oculopalatal tremor may also improve following treatment with memantine or gabapentin. The infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) may have only a minor impact on vision if "foveation periods" are well developed, but symptomatic patients may benefit from treatment with gabapentin, memantine, or base-out prisms to induce convergence. Several surgical therapies are also reported to improve INS, but selection of the optimal treatment depends on careful evaluation of visual acuity and nystagmus intensity in various gaze positions. Electro-optical devices are a promising and novel approach for treating the visual consequences of acquired forms of nystagmus.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44106-5040, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21107124

Citation

Thurtell, Matthew J., and R John Leigh. "Therapy for Nystagmus." Journal of Neuro-ophthalmology : the Official Journal of the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society, vol. 30, no. 4, 2010, pp. 361-71.
Thurtell MJ, Leigh RJ. Therapy for nystagmus. J Neuroophthalmol. 2010;30(4):361-71.
Thurtell, M. J., & Leigh, R. J. (2010). Therapy for nystagmus. Journal of Neuro-ophthalmology : the Official Journal of the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society, 30(4), 361-71. https://doi.org/10.1097/WNO.0b013e3181e7518f
Thurtell MJ, Leigh RJ. Therapy for Nystagmus. J Neuroophthalmol. 2010;30(4):361-71. PubMed PMID: 21107124.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Therapy for nystagmus. AU - Thurtell,Matthew J, AU - Leigh,R John, PY - 2010/11/26/entrez PY - 2010/11/26/pubmed PY - 2011/11/9/medline SP - 361 EP - 71 JF - Journal of neuro-ophthalmology : the official journal of the North American Neuro-Ophthalmology Society JO - J Neuroophthalmol VL - 30 IS - 4 N2 - Pathological forms of nystagmus and their visual consequences can be treated using pharmacological, optical, and surgical approaches. Acquired periodic alternating nystagmus improves following treatment with baclofen, and downbeat nystagmus may improve following treatment with aminopyridines. Gabapentin and memantine are helpful in reducing acquired pendular nystagmus due to multiple sclerosis. Ocular oscillations in oculopalatal tremor may also improve following treatment with memantine or gabapentin. The infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS) may have only a minor impact on vision if "foveation periods" are well developed, but symptomatic patients may benefit from treatment with gabapentin, memantine, or base-out prisms to induce convergence. Several surgical therapies are also reported to improve INS, but selection of the optimal treatment depends on careful evaluation of visual acuity and nystagmus intensity in various gaze positions. Electro-optical devices are a promising and novel approach for treating the visual consequences of acquired forms of nystagmus. SN - 1536-5166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21107124/Therapy_for_nystagmus_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/WNO.0b013e3181e7518f DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -