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Type D personality and posttraumatic stress disorder in victims of violence: a cross-sectional exploration.
Clin Psychol Psychother. 2011 Jan-Feb; 18(1):13-22.CP

Abstract

The current study explored the relationship between type D personality and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among victims of violence (n = 189). The basic premise underlying the type D concept is that it is not the experience of negative emotions per se that renders individuals at risk of maladjustment in the face of adversity, but the way they are dealt with. Particularly the combination of high negative affectivity and social inhibition (i.e., the non-expression of emotions and inhibition of behaviours in social interactions) is assumed to be maladaptive. It was hypothesized that a high score on negative affectivity (i.e., above a pre-determined cut-off score) would only contribute to PTSD in the presence of a high score on social inhibition (also above a pre-determined cut-off score). Univariate results indicated that type D subjects (type Ds) reported higher PTSD symptom levels than those characterized by high negative affectivity/low social inhibition or low negative affectivity. Type Ds more often suffered from probable PTSD than non-type Ds. In multivariate analyses, type D personality was associated with an increased risk of probable PTSD above and beyond background variables, while high negative affectivity/low social inhibition was not. Results were discussed in light of victim support practices and study limitations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Law, International Victimology Institute Tilburg, Tilburg, the Netherlands. m.j.kunst@uvt.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21110402

Citation

Kunst, M J J., et al. "Type D Personality and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Victims of Violence: a Cross-sectional Exploration." Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, vol. 18, no. 1, 2011, pp. 13-22.
Kunst MJ, Bogaerts S, Winkel FW. Type D personality and posttraumatic stress disorder in victims of violence: a cross-sectional exploration. Clin Psychol Psychother. 2011;18(1):13-22.
Kunst, M. J., Bogaerts, S., & Winkel, F. W. (2011). Type D personality and posttraumatic stress disorder in victims of violence: a cross-sectional exploration. Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy, 18(1), 13-22. https://doi.org/10.1002/cpp.698
Kunst MJ, Bogaerts S, Winkel FW. Type D Personality and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Victims of Violence: a Cross-sectional Exploration. Clin Psychol Psychother. 2011 Jan-Feb;18(1):13-22. PubMed PMID: 21110402.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Type D personality and posttraumatic stress disorder in victims of violence: a cross-sectional exploration. AU - Kunst,M J J, AU - Bogaerts,S, AU - Winkel,F W, PY - 2010/11/27/entrez PY - 2010/11/27/pubmed PY - 2011/5/7/medline SP - 13 EP - 22 JF - Clinical psychology & psychotherapy JO - Clin Psychol Psychother VL - 18 IS - 1 N2 - The current study explored the relationship between type D personality and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among victims of violence (n = 189). The basic premise underlying the type D concept is that it is not the experience of negative emotions per se that renders individuals at risk of maladjustment in the face of adversity, but the way they are dealt with. Particularly the combination of high negative affectivity and social inhibition (i.e., the non-expression of emotions and inhibition of behaviours in social interactions) is assumed to be maladaptive. It was hypothesized that a high score on negative affectivity (i.e., above a pre-determined cut-off score) would only contribute to PTSD in the presence of a high score on social inhibition (also above a pre-determined cut-off score). Univariate results indicated that type D subjects (type Ds) reported higher PTSD symptom levels than those characterized by high negative affectivity/low social inhibition or low negative affectivity. Type Ds more often suffered from probable PTSD than non-type Ds. In multivariate analyses, type D personality was associated with an increased risk of probable PTSD above and beyond background variables, while high negative affectivity/low social inhibition was not. Results were discussed in light of victim support practices and study limitations. SN - 1099-0879 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21110402/Type_D_personality_and_posttraumatic_stress_disorder_in_victims_of_violence:_a_cross_sectional_exploration_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cpp.698 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -