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Dietary sensitivities and ADHD symptoms: thirty-five years of research.
Clin Pediatr (Phila) 2011; 50(4):279-93CPed

Abstract

Artificial food colors (AFCs) have not been established as the main cause of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but accumulated evidence suggests that a subgroup shows significant symptom improvement when consuming an AFC-free diet and reacts with ADHD-type symptoms on challenge with AFCs. Of children with suspected sensitivities, 65% to 89% reacted when challenged with at least 100 mg of AFC. Oligoantigenic diet studies suggested that some children in addition to being sensitive to AFCs are also sensitive to common nonsalicylate foods (milk, chocolate, soy, eggs, wheat, corn, legumes) as well as salicylate-containing grapes, tomatoes, and orange. Some studies found "cosensitivity" to be more the rule than the exception. Recently, 2 large studies demonstrated behavioral sensitivity to AFCs and benzoate in children both with and without ADHD. A trial elimination diet is appropriate for children who have not responded satisfactorily to conventional treatment or whose parents wish to pursue a dietary investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Foods & Nutrition, Purdue University, 700 State Street (G-46), West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA. stevens5@purdue.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21127082

Citation

Stevens, Laura J., et al. "Dietary Sensitivities and ADHD Symptoms: Thirty-five Years of Research." Clinical Pediatrics, vol. 50, no. 4, 2011, pp. 279-93.
Stevens LJ, Kuczek T, Burgess JR, et al. Dietary sensitivities and ADHD symptoms: thirty-five years of research. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2011;50(4):279-93.
Stevens, L. J., Kuczek, T., Burgess, J. R., Hurt, E., & Arnold, L. E. (2011). Dietary sensitivities and ADHD symptoms: thirty-five years of research. Clinical Pediatrics, 50(4), pp. 279-93. doi:10.1177/0009922810384728.
Stevens LJ, et al. Dietary Sensitivities and ADHD Symptoms: Thirty-five Years of Research. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2011;50(4):279-93. PubMed PMID: 21127082.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary sensitivities and ADHD symptoms: thirty-five years of research. AU - Stevens,Laura J, AU - Kuczek,Thomas, AU - Burgess,John R, AU - Hurt,Elizabeth, AU - Arnold,L Eugene, Y1 - 2010/12/02/ PY - 2010/12/4/entrez PY - 2010/12/4/pubmed PY - 2011/7/27/medline SP - 279 EP - 93 JF - Clinical pediatrics JO - Clin Pediatr (Phila) VL - 50 IS - 4 N2 - Artificial food colors (AFCs) have not been established as the main cause of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but accumulated evidence suggests that a subgroup shows significant symptom improvement when consuming an AFC-free diet and reacts with ADHD-type symptoms on challenge with AFCs. Of children with suspected sensitivities, 65% to 89% reacted when challenged with at least 100 mg of AFC. Oligoantigenic diet studies suggested that some children in addition to being sensitive to AFCs are also sensitive to common nonsalicylate foods (milk, chocolate, soy, eggs, wheat, corn, legumes) as well as salicylate-containing grapes, tomatoes, and orange. Some studies found "cosensitivity" to be more the rule than the exception. Recently, 2 large studies demonstrated behavioral sensitivity to AFCs and benzoate in children both with and without ADHD. A trial elimination diet is appropriate for children who have not responded satisfactorily to conventional treatment or whose parents wish to pursue a dietary investigation. SN - 1938-2707 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21127082/full_citation L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0009922810384728?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -