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Comparison of measured and parents' reported height and weight in children and adolescents.
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2011 May; 19(5):1040-6.O

Abstract

The objectives of this study were to (i) compare parent-reported height and weight to measured height and weight in children between ages 2 and 17 years, (ii) investigate correlations between magnitude of error of parent-reported data or refusal to estimate height and weight with gender, race/ethnicity, child's age, and age-specific BMI z-score, and (iii) determine sensitivity and specificity of identifying obese youth based on parent-reported data. The authors studied 1,430 consecutive outpatients between ages 2 and 17 years at an outpatient orthopedic clinic. At the initial visit, parents completed a questionnaire including their child's height and weight; height and weight were then measured. Mean height error was very small, with slight overestimation in boys and underestimation in girls. Mean weight error increased with age (P < 0.001), and girls had a larger mean weight error (1.29 kg, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.65, 1.45) than boys (0.85 kg, 95% CI: 0.8: 0.58, 1.12). Mean weight error also increased with age-specific BMI z-score (r = 0.32, P < 0.001). Correlation between weight error and age-specific BMI z-score was higher among black children (r = 0.45, P < 0.001) than among Hispanic children (r = 0.37, P < 0.001) and was lowest among white children (r = 0.29, P < 0.001). Refusal or inability to estimate weight did not correlate with age-specific BMI z-score. Twenty-one percent of children who were obese would not be identified by using parent-reported data to calculate the BMI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health and Human Performance, University of Houston, Houston, Texas, USA. doconnor2@uh.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21127476

Citation

O'Connor, Daniel P., and Joseph J. Gugenheim. "Comparison of Measured and Parents' Reported Height and Weight in Children and Adolescents." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 19, no. 5, 2011, pp. 1040-6.
O'Connor DP, Gugenheim JJ. Comparison of measured and parents' reported height and weight in children and adolescents. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2011;19(5):1040-6.
O'Connor, D. P., & Gugenheim, J. J. (2011). Comparison of measured and parents' reported height and weight in children and adolescents. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 19(5), 1040-6. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2010.278
O'Connor DP, Gugenheim JJ. Comparison of Measured and Parents' Reported Height and Weight in Children and Adolescents. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2011;19(5):1040-6. PubMed PMID: 21127476.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Comparison of measured and parents' reported height and weight in children and adolescents. AU - O'Connor,Daniel P, AU - Gugenheim,Joseph J, Y1 - 2010/12/02/ PY - 2010/12/4/entrez PY - 2010/12/4/pubmed PY - 2012/5/5/medline SP - 1040 EP - 6 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 19 IS - 5 N2 - The objectives of this study were to (i) compare parent-reported height and weight to measured height and weight in children between ages 2 and 17 years, (ii) investigate correlations between magnitude of error of parent-reported data or refusal to estimate height and weight with gender, race/ethnicity, child's age, and age-specific BMI z-score, and (iii) determine sensitivity and specificity of identifying obese youth based on parent-reported data. The authors studied 1,430 consecutive outpatients between ages 2 and 17 years at an outpatient orthopedic clinic. At the initial visit, parents completed a questionnaire including their child's height and weight; height and weight were then measured. Mean height error was very small, with slight overestimation in boys and underestimation in girls. Mean weight error increased with age (P < 0.001), and girls had a larger mean weight error (1.29 kg, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.65, 1.45) than boys (0.85 kg, 95% CI: 0.8: 0.58, 1.12). Mean weight error also increased with age-specific BMI z-score (r = 0.32, P < 0.001). Correlation between weight error and age-specific BMI z-score was higher among black children (r = 0.45, P < 0.001) than among Hispanic children (r = 0.37, P < 0.001) and was lowest among white children (r = 0.29, P < 0.001). Refusal or inability to estimate weight did not correlate with age-specific BMI z-score. Twenty-one percent of children who were obese would not be identified by using parent-reported data to calculate the BMI. SN - 1930-739X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21127476/Comparison_of_measured_and_parents'_reported_height_and_weight_in_children_and_adolescents_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2010.278 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -