Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Stability, bioavailability, and bacterial toxicity of ZnO and iron-doped ZnO nanoparticles in aquatic media.
Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Jan 15; 45(2):755-61.ES

Abstract

The stability and bioavailability of nanoparticles is governed by the interfacial properties that nanoparticles acquire when immersed in a particular aquatic media as well as the type of organism or cell under consideration. Herein, high-throughput screening (HTS) was used to elucidate ZnO nanoparticle stability, bioavailability, and antibacterial mechanisms as a function of iron doping level (in the ZnO nanoparticles), aquatic chemistry, and bacterial cell type. ζ-Potential and aggregation state of dispersed ZnO nanoparticles was strongly influenced by iron doping in addition to electrolyte composition and dissolved organic matter; however, bacterial inactivation by ZnO nanoparticles was most significantly influenced by Zn(2+) ions dissolution, cell type, and organic matter. Nanoparticle IC(50) values determined for Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli were on the order of 0.3-0.5 and 15-43 mg/L (as Zn(2+)), while the IC(50) for Zn(2+) tolerant Pseudomonas putida was always >500 mg/L. Tannic acid decreased toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles more than humic, fulvic, and alginic acid, because it complexed the most free Zn(2+) ions, thereby reducing their bioavailability. These results underscore the complexities and challenges regulators face in assessing potential environmental impacts of nanotechnology; however, the high-throughput and combinatorial methods employed promise to rapidly expand the knowledge base needed to develop an appropriate risk assessment framework.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, California NanoSystems Institute, University of California-Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California, 90095-1593, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21133426

Citation

Li, Minghua, et al. "Stability, Bioavailability, and Bacterial Toxicity of ZnO and Iron-doped ZnO Nanoparticles in Aquatic Media." Environmental Science & Technology, vol. 45, no. 2, 2011, pp. 755-61.
Li M, Pokhrel S, Jin X, et al. Stability, bioavailability, and bacterial toxicity of ZnO and iron-doped ZnO nanoparticles in aquatic media. Environ Sci Technol. 2011;45(2):755-61.
Li, M., Pokhrel, S., Jin, X., Mädler, L., Damoiseaux, R., & Hoek, E. M. (2011). Stability, bioavailability, and bacterial toxicity of ZnO and iron-doped ZnO nanoparticles in aquatic media. Environmental Science & Technology, 45(2), 755-61. https://doi.org/10.1021/es102266g
Li M, et al. Stability, Bioavailability, and Bacterial Toxicity of ZnO and Iron-doped ZnO Nanoparticles in Aquatic Media. Environ Sci Technol. 2011 Jan 15;45(2):755-61. PubMed PMID: 21133426.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Stability, bioavailability, and bacterial toxicity of ZnO and iron-doped ZnO nanoparticles in aquatic media. AU - Li,Minghua, AU - Pokhrel,Suman, AU - Jin,Xue, AU - Mädler,Lutz, AU - Damoiseaux,Robert, AU - Hoek,Eric M V, Y1 - 2010/12/06/ PY - 2010/12/8/entrez PY - 2010/12/8/pubmed PY - 2011/3/30/medline SP - 755 EP - 61 JF - Environmental science & technology JO - Environ Sci Technol VL - 45 IS - 2 N2 - The stability and bioavailability of nanoparticles is governed by the interfacial properties that nanoparticles acquire when immersed in a particular aquatic media as well as the type of organism or cell under consideration. Herein, high-throughput screening (HTS) was used to elucidate ZnO nanoparticle stability, bioavailability, and antibacterial mechanisms as a function of iron doping level (in the ZnO nanoparticles), aquatic chemistry, and bacterial cell type. ζ-Potential and aggregation state of dispersed ZnO nanoparticles was strongly influenced by iron doping in addition to electrolyte composition and dissolved organic matter; however, bacterial inactivation by ZnO nanoparticles was most significantly influenced by Zn(2+) ions dissolution, cell type, and organic matter. Nanoparticle IC(50) values determined for Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli were on the order of 0.3-0.5 and 15-43 mg/L (as Zn(2+)), while the IC(50) for Zn(2+) tolerant Pseudomonas putida was always >500 mg/L. Tannic acid decreased toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles more than humic, fulvic, and alginic acid, because it complexed the most free Zn(2+) ions, thereby reducing their bioavailability. These results underscore the complexities and challenges regulators face in assessing potential environmental impacts of nanotechnology; however, the high-throughput and combinatorial methods employed promise to rapidly expand the knowledge base needed to develop an appropriate risk assessment framework. SN - 1520-5851 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21133426/Stability_bioavailability_and_bacterial_toxicity_of_ZnO_and_iron_doped_ZnO_nanoparticles_in_aquatic_media_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/es102266g DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -