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In vitro and in vivo efficacies of mefloquine-based treatment against alveolar echinococcosis.
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2011 Feb; 55(2):713-21.AA

Abstract

Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is caused by the metacestode stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis and causes severe disease in the human liver, and occasionally in other organs, that is fatal when treatment is unsuccessful. The present chemotherapy against AE is based on mebendazole and albendazole. Albendazole treatment has been found to be ineffective in some instances, is parasitostatic rather than parasiticidal, and usually involves the lifelong uptake of large doses of drugs. Thus, new treatment options are urgently needed. In this study we investigated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of mefloquine against E. multilocularis metacestodes. Treatment using mefloquine (20 μM) against in vitro cultures of metacestodes resulted in rapid and complete detachment of large parts of the germinal layer from the inner surface of the laminated layer within a few hours. The in vitro activity of mefloquine was dependent on the dosage. In vitro culture of metacestodes in the presence of 24 μM mefloquine for a period of 10 days was parasiticidal, as determined by murine bioassays, while treatment with 12 μM was not. Oral application of mefloquine (25 mg/kg of body weight administered twice a week for a period of 8 weeks) in E. multilocularis-infected mice was ineffective in achieving any reduction of parasite weight, whereas treatment with albendazole (200 mg/kg/day) was highly effective. However, when the same mefloquine dosage was applied intraperitoneally, the reduction in parasite weight was similar to the reduction seen with oral albendazole application. Combined application of both drugs did not increase the treatment efficacy. In conclusion, mefloquine represents an interesting drug candidate for the treatment of AE, and these results should be followed up in appropriate in vivo studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Parasitology, Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Berne, Berne, Switzerland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21135182

Citation

Küster, Tatiana, et al. "In Vitro and in Vivo Efficacies of Mefloquine-based Treatment Against Alveolar Echinococcosis." Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, vol. 55, no. 2, 2011, pp. 713-21.
Küster T, Stadelmann B, Hermann C, et al. In vitro and in vivo efficacies of mefloquine-based treatment against alveolar echinococcosis. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2011;55(2):713-21.
Küster, T., Stadelmann, B., Hermann, C., Scholl, S., Keiser, J., & Hemphill, A. (2011). In vitro and in vivo efficacies of mefloquine-based treatment against alveolar echinococcosis. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 55(2), 713-21. https://doi.org/10.1128/AAC.01392-10
Küster T, et al. In Vitro and in Vivo Efficacies of Mefloquine-based Treatment Against Alveolar Echinococcosis. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2011;55(2):713-21. PubMed PMID: 21135182.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - In vitro and in vivo efficacies of mefloquine-based treatment against alveolar echinococcosis. AU - Küster,Tatiana, AU - Stadelmann,Britta, AU - Hermann,Corina, AU - Scholl,Sabrina, AU - Keiser,Jennifer, AU - Hemphill,Andrew, Y1 - 2010/12/06/ PY - 2010/12/8/entrez PY - 2010/12/8/pubmed PY - 2011/5/20/medline SP - 713 EP - 21 JF - Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy JO - Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. VL - 55 IS - 2 N2 - Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is caused by the metacestode stage of the fox tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis and causes severe disease in the human liver, and occasionally in other organs, that is fatal when treatment is unsuccessful. The present chemotherapy against AE is based on mebendazole and albendazole. Albendazole treatment has been found to be ineffective in some instances, is parasitostatic rather than parasiticidal, and usually involves the lifelong uptake of large doses of drugs. Thus, new treatment options are urgently needed. In this study we investigated the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of mefloquine against E. multilocularis metacestodes. Treatment using mefloquine (20 μM) against in vitro cultures of metacestodes resulted in rapid and complete detachment of large parts of the germinal layer from the inner surface of the laminated layer within a few hours. The in vitro activity of mefloquine was dependent on the dosage. In vitro culture of metacestodes in the presence of 24 μM mefloquine for a period of 10 days was parasiticidal, as determined by murine bioassays, while treatment with 12 μM was not. Oral application of mefloquine (25 mg/kg of body weight administered twice a week for a period of 8 weeks) in E. multilocularis-infected mice was ineffective in achieving any reduction of parasite weight, whereas treatment with albendazole (200 mg/kg/day) was highly effective. However, when the same mefloquine dosage was applied intraperitoneally, the reduction in parasite weight was similar to the reduction seen with oral albendazole application. Combined application of both drugs did not increase the treatment efficacy. In conclusion, mefloquine represents an interesting drug candidate for the treatment of AE, and these results should be followed up in appropriate in vivo studies. SN - 1098-6596 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21135182/In_vitro_and_in_vivo_efficacies_of_mefloquine_based_treatment_against_alveolar_echinococcosis_ L2 - http://aac.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=21135182 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -