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Acute inpatient presentation of scurvy.
Cutis. 2010 Oct; 86(4):205-7.C

Abstract

Scurvy is a well-known disease of vitamin C deficiency that still occurs in industrialized countries. The clinical manifestations of follicular hyperkeratosis, perifollicular petechiae, corkscrew hairs, and easy bruising are due to defective collagen synthesis and can be mistaken for small vessel vasculitis. Populations at risk for development of scurvy include elderly patients, alcohol and drug users, individuals who follow restrictive diets or have eating disorders, patients with malabsorption, and individuals with mental illness. We report an acute case of scurvy presenting in the inpatient/hospital setting with clinical findings initially thought to represent vasculitis. A high index of suspicion for scurvy must be kept in the appropriate clinical context, and a thorough medical history and physical examination are vital to make the diagnosis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1530 3rd Ave S, EFH 414, Birmingham, AL 35294-0009, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21140930

Citation

Swanson, Allison M., and Lauren C. Hughey. "Acute Inpatient Presentation of Scurvy." Cutis, vol. 86, no. 4, 2010, pp. 205-7.
Swanson AM, Hughey LC. Acute inpatient presentation of scurvy. Cutis. 2010;86(4):205-7.
Swanson, A. M., & Hughey, L. C. (2010). Acute inpatient presentation of scurvy. Cutis, 86(4), 205-7.
Swanson AM, Hughey LC. Acute Inpatient Presentation of Scurvy. Cutis. 2010;86(4):205-7. PubMed PMID: 21140930.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acute inpatient presentation of scurvy. AU - Swanson,Allison M, AU - Hughey,Lauren C, PY - 2010/12/15/entrez PY - 2010/12/15/pubmed PY - 2011/1/5/medline SP - 205 EP - 7 JF - Cutis JO - Cutis VL - 86 IS - 4 N2 - Scurvy is a well-known disease of vitamin C deficiency that still occurs in industrialized countries. The clinical manifestations of follicular hyperkeratosis, perifollicular petechiae, corkscrew hairs, and easy bruising are due to defective collagen synthesis and can be mistaken for small vessel vasculitis. Populations at risk for development of scurvy include elderly patients, alcohol and drug users, individuals who follow restrictive diets or have eating disorders, patients with malabsorption, and individuals with mental illness. We report an acute case of scurvy presenting in the inpatient/hospital setting with clinical findings initially thought to represent vasculitis. A high index of suspicion for scurvy must be kept in the appropriate clinical context, and a thorough medical history and physical examination are vital to make the diagnosis. SN - 0011-4162 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21140930/Acute_inpatient_presentation_of_scurvy_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/6471 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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