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Neuromyelitis optica: a case report.
Pediatr Neonatol 2010; 51(6):347-52PN

Abstract

Neuromyelitis optica (NMO, Devic's syndrome) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that predominantly affects the spinal cord and optic nerves. It is often confused with multiple sclerosis. Early discrimination between NMO and multiple sclerosis is important because the two diseases have different natural histories and treatment regimens. Seropositivity for NMO-IgG and longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (3 or more spinal segments) are characteristic of NMO. Despite the absence of a definitive therapeutic strategy for NMO syndrome, methylprednisolone pulse therapy is recommended in the acute phase. Treatment strategies in relapse phases are aimed at preventing relapses, and increasing evidence shows a better clinical response of immunosuppressive therapy than immuno-modulating therapy (a standard multiple sclerosis-modulating therapy). We describe a 10-year-old girl who had visual loss due to acute optic neuritis at 6 years old and suffered repetitive myelitis 2 years later. NMO was diagnosed because of characteristic longitudinal myelitis and positive NMO-IgG. After combining therapy with prednisolone and an immunosuppressant (cyclophosphamide), the patient's medical condition was stable and no relapse symptoms were observed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Yong Kang Campus, 901 Chung Hwa Road, Tainan, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21146800

Citation

Chia, Wei-Chia, et al. "Neuromyelitis Optica: a Case Report." Pediatrics and Neonatology, vol. 51, no. 6, 2010, pp. 347-52.
Chia WC, Wang JN, Lai MC. Neuromyelitis optica: a case report. Pediatr Neonatol. 2010;51(6):347-52.
Chia, W. C., Wang, J. N., & Lai, M. C. (2010). Neuromyelitis optica: a case report. Pediatrics and Neonatology, 51(6), pp. 347-52. doi:10.1016/S1875-9572(10)60067-8.
Chia WC, Wang JN, Lai MC. Neuromyelitis Optica: a Case Report. Pediatr Neonatol. 2010;51(6):347-52. PubMed PMID: 21146800.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Neuromyelitis optica: a case report. AU - Chia,Wei-Chia, AU - Wang,Jian-Nan, AU - Lai,Ming-Chi, PY - 2009/06/29/received PY - 2009/10/26/revised PY - 2009/11/15/accepted PY - 2010/12/15/entrez PY - 2010/12/15/pubmed PY - 2011/3/25/medline SP - 347 EP - 52 JF - Pediatrics and neonatology JO - Pediatr Neonatol VL - 51 IS - 6 N2 - Neuromyelitis optica (NMO, Devic's syndrome) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that predominantly affects the spinal cord and optic nerves. It is often confused with multiple sclerosis. Early discrimination between NMO and multiple sclerosis is important because the two diseases have different natural histories and treatment regimens. Seropositivity for NMO-IgG and longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (3 or more spinal segments) are characteristic of NMO. Despite the absence of a definitive therapeutic strategy for NMO syndrome, methylprednisolone pulse therapy is recommended in the acute phase. Treatment strategies in relapse phases are aimed at preventing relapses, and increasing evidence shows a better clinical response of immunosuppressive therapy than immuno-modulating therapy (a standard multiple sclerosis-modulating therapy). We describe a 10-year-old girl who had visual loss due to acute optic neuritis at 6 years old and suffered repetitive myelitis 2 years later. NMO was diagnosed because of characteristic longitudinal myelitis and positive NMO-IgG. After combining therapy with prednisolone and an immunosuppressant (cyclophosphamide), the patient's medical condition was stable and no relapse symptoms were observed. SN - 1875-9572 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21146800/Neuromyelitis_optica:_a_case_report_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1875-9572(10)60067-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -