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Risk factors of potentially inappropriate medications among older patients visiting the community health center in rural Taiwan.
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2011 Sep-Oct; 53(2):225-8.AG

Abstract

The adverse drug reactions caused by potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) are closely related to emergency department visits and acute hospital admissions in the elderly population. It has been reported that 11.5-14% of community-dwelling elderly patients were prescribed for at least one PIM, but little is known regarding to it in rural Taiwan. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of PIMs among older patients visiting the outpatient clinic of a community health center in rural Taiwan. In August of 2008, all elderly patients attended the outpatient clinic of a community health center in I-Lan County were enrolled for study. PIMs are evaluated by Beers' criteria. In total, 327 patients (mean age: 74.8 ± 5.3 years old, 49.5% males) were enrolled, and 27.5% (90/327) of them were prescribed for at least one PIM. The most common PIMs were antihistamines (50.9%) and muscle relaxants (39.0%). In particular, 87.6% of these PIMs were having a high severity potential. Patients had PIMs were significantly older (76.2 ± 6.9 vs. 74.2 ± 6.1 years, p = 0.011), being prescribed for more drugs (3.7 ± 1.4 vs. 2.4 ± 1.7 items, p<0.001), and more commonly to visit due to acute diseases (64.4% vs. 24.9%, p < 0.001) than those had no PIM. Multiple logistic regression showed that older age (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.00-1.09, p = 0.046), higher number of prescribed medications (OR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.39-1.98, p < 0.001), and diagnosis of acute diseases (OR = 8.98, 95% CI = 4.71-17.10, p < 0.001) are all independent risk factors for PIMs. In conclusion, the prevalence of PIMs in the outpatient clinic of the community health care center in rural Taiwan was 27.5%. Older age, higher number of prescribed medications and diagnosis of acute diseases are independent risk factors for PIMs in rural Taiwan.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, No. 201, Sec. 2, Shih-Pai Road, Taipei 11217, Taiwan; National Yang Ming University School of Medicine, No. 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Taipei 11217, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21159391

Citation

Lin, Yung-Jie, et al. "Risk Factors of Potentially Inappropriate Medications Among Older Patients Visiting the Community Health Center in Rural Taiwan." Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, vol. 53, no. 2, 2011, pp. 225-8.
Lin YJ, Peng LN, Chen LK, et al. Risk factors of potentially inappropriate medications among older patients visiting the community health center in rural Taiwan. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2011;53(2):225-8.
Lin, Y. J., Peng, L. N., Chen, L. K., Lin, M. H., & Hwang, S. J. (2011). Risk factors of potentially inappropriate medications among older patients visiting the community health center in rural Taiwan. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 53(2), 225-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2010.11.017
Lin YJ, et al. Risk Factors of Potentially Inappropriate Medications Among Older Patients Visiting the Community Health Center in Rural Taiwan. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2011 Sep-Oct;53(2):225-8. PubMed PMID: 21159391.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Risk factors of potentially inappropriate medications among older patients visiting the community health center in rural Taiwan. AU - Lin,Yung-Jie, AU - Peng,Li-Ning, AU - Chen,Liang-Kung, AU - Lin,Ming-Hsien, AU - Hwang,Shinn-Jang, Y1 - 2010/12/14/ PY - 2010/07/28/received PY - 2010/11/13/revised PY - 2010/11/15/accepted PY - 2010/12/17/entrez PY - 2010/12/17/pubmed PY - 2011/12/21/medline SP - 225 EP - 8 JF - Archives of gerontology and geriatrics JO - Arch Gerontol Geriatr VL - 53 IS - 2 N2 - The adverse drug reactions caused by potentially inappropriate medications (PIMs) are closely related to emergency department visits and acute hospital admissions in the elderly population. It has been reported that 11.5-14% of community-dwelling elderly patients were prescribed for at least one PIM, but little is known regarding to it in rural Taiwan. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and risk factors of PIMs among older patients visiting the outpatient clinic of a community health center in rural Taiwan. In August of 2008, all elderly patients attended the outpatient clinic of a community health center in I-Lan County were enrolled for study. PIMs are evaluated by Beers' criteria. In total, 327 patients (mean age: 74.8 ± 5.3 years old, 49.5% males) were enrolled, and 27.5% (90/327) of them were prescribed for at least one PIM. The most common PIMs were antihistamines (50.9%) and muscle relaxants (39.0%). In particular, 87.6% of these PIMs were having a high severity potential. Patients had PIMs were significantly older (76.2 ± 6.9 vs. 74.2 ± 6.1 years, p = 0.011), being prescribed for more drugs (3.7 ± 1.4 vs. 2.4 ± 1.7 items, p<0.001), and more commonly to visit due to acute diseases (64.4% vs. 24.9%, p < 0.001) than those had no PIM. Multiple logistic regression showed that older age (OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 1.00-1.09, p = 0.046), higher number of prescribed medications (OR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.39-1.98, p < 0.001), and diagnosis of acute diseases (OR = 8.98, 95% CI = 4.71-17.10, p < 0.001) are all independent risk factors for PIMs. In conclusion, the prevalence of PIMs in the outpatient clinic of the community health care center in rural Taiwan was 27.5%. Older age, higher number of prescribed medications and diagnosis of acute diseases are independent risk factors for PIMs in rural Taiwan. SN - 1872-6976 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21159391/Risk_factors_of_potentially_inappropriate_medications_among_older_patients_visiting_the_community_health_center_in_rural_Taiwan_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-4943(10)00307-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -