Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Caffeine lowers muscle pain during exercise in hot but not cool environments.
Physiol Behav. 2011 Mar 01; 102(3-4):429-35.PB

Abstract

Caffeine (CAF) ingestion may enhance endurance exercise by lowering perceived exertion (RPE) and muscle pain. However, exercise in the heat may be detrimental to performance by increasing RPE and pain. The purpose of this study was to examine if caffeine affects pain and related perceptual responses differently in cool and hot ambient conditions. Eleven male cyclists (mean ± SD; age, 25 ± 6 years; mass, 72.6 ± 8.1 kg; VO(2max), 58.7 ± 2.9 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) completed four trials in a randomized, double blind design. While remaining euhydrated, subjects cycled for 90 min at 65 ± 7% VO(2max) followed by a 15-min performance trial. Subjects ingested 3 mg kg(-1) of encapsulated caffeine (CAF) or placebo (PLA) 60 min before and 45 after beginning exercise in 12°C and 33°C (i.e., 12-CAF, 33-CAF, 12-PLA, and 33-PLA trials). Central, local, and overall perceived exertion (C-, L-, and O-RPE) and pain were measured throughout exercise. Throughout submaximal exercise C-, L-, and O-RPE were significantly greater in 33°C (P<0.05) but were not affected by CAF (P>0.05). Using area-under-the-curve analysis, pain in 33-PLA was increased by 74% vs 12-PLA (P<0.05). CAF did not reduce pain in 12°C (P=0.542), but in 33°C, CAF reduced pain by 27% (P=0.032). Despite this apparent advantage, CAF improved performance independent of ambient temperature (i.e., non-significant interaction; P=0.662). This study found that, although caffeine improves exercise capacity, its effect on leg muscle pain is dependent on ambient temperature. Although exercise in the heat increases muscle pain compared to a cooler environment, caffeine reduces this pain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Performance Laboratory, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA. MatthewGanio@texashealth.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21163281

Citation

Ganio, Matthew S., et al. "Caffeine Lowers Muscle Pain During Exercise in Hot but Not Cool Environments." Physiology & Behavior, vol. 102, no. 3-4, 2011, pp. 429-35.
Ganio MS, Johnson EC, Lopez RM, et al. Caffeine lowers muscle pain during exercise in hot but not cool environments. Physiol Behav. 2011;102(3-4):429-35.
Ganio, M. S., Johnson, E. C., Lopez, R. M., Stearns, R. L., Emmanuel, H., Anderson, J. M., Casa, D. J., Maresh, C. M., Volek, J. S., & Armstrong, L. E. (2011). Caffeine lowers muscle pain during exercise in hot but not cool environments. Physiology & Behavior, 102(3-4), 429-35. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physbeh.2010.12.005
Ganio MS, et al. Caffeine Lowers Muscle Pain During Exercise in Hot but Not Cool Environments. Physiol Behav. 2011 Mar 1;102(3-4):429-35. PubMed PMID: 21163281.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Caffeine lowers muscle pain during exercise in hot but not cool environments. AU - Ganio,Matthew S, AU - Johnson,Evan C, AU - Lopez,Rebecca M, AU - Stearns,Rebecca L, AU - Emmanuel,Holly, AU - Anderson,Jeffrey M, AU - Casa,Douglas J, AU - Maresh,Carl M, AU - Volek,Jeff S, AU - Armstrong,Lawrence E, Y1 - 2010/12/14/ PY - 2010/07/20/received PY - 2010/11/10/revised PY - 2010/12/06/accepted PY - 2010/12/18/entrez PY - 2010/12/18/pubmed PY - 2011/5/26/medline SP - 429 EP - 35 JF - Physiology & behavior JO - Physiol. Behav. VL - 102 IS - 3-4 N2 - Caffeine (CAF) ingestion may enhance endurance exercise by lowering perceived exertion (RPE) and muscle pain. However, exercise in the heat may be detrimental to performance by increasing RPE and pain. The purpose of this study was to examine if caffeine affects pain and related perceptual responses differently in cool and hot ambient conditions. Eleven male cyclists (mean ± SD; age, 25 ± 6 years; mass, 72.6 ± 8.1 kg; VO(2max), 58.7 ± 2.9 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) completed four trials in a randomized, double blind design. While remaining euhydrated, subjects cycled for 90 min at 65 ± 7% VO(2max) followed by a 15-min performance trial. Subjects ingested 3 mg kg(-1) of encapsulated caffeine (CAF) or placebo (PLA) 60 min before and 45 after beginning exercise in 12°C and 33°C (i.e., 12-CAF, 33-CAF, 12-PLA, and 33-PLA trials). Central, local, and overall perceived exertion (C-, L-, and O-RPE) and pain were measured throughout exercise. Throughout submaximal exercise C-, L-, and O-RPE were significantly greater in 33°C (P<0.05) but were not affected by CAF (P>0.05). Using area-under-the-curve analysis, pain in 33-PLA was increased by 74% vs 12-PLA (P<0.05). CAF did not reduce pain in 12°C (P=0.542), but in 33°C, CAF reduced pain by 27% (P=0.032). Despite this apparent advantage, CAF improved performance independent of ambient temperature (i.e., non-significant interaction; P=0.662). This study found that, although caffeine improves exercise capacity, its effect on leg muscle pain is dependent on ambient temperature. Although exercise in the heat increases muscle pain compared to a cooler environment, caffeine reduces this pain. SN - 1873-507X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21163281/Caffeine_lowers_muscle_pain_during_exercise_in_hot_but_not_cool_environments_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0031-9384(10)00452-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -