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Racial disparities in exposure, susceptibility, and access to health care in the US H1N1 influenza pandemic.
Am J Public Health. 2011 Feb; 101(2):285-93.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We conducted the first empirical examination of disparities in H1N1 exposure, susceptibility to H1N1 complications, and access to health care during the H1N1 influenza pandemic.

METHODS

We conducted a nationally representative survey among a sample drawn from more than 60,000 US households. We analyzed responses from 1479 adults, including significant numbers of Blacks and Hispanics. The survey asked respondents about their ability to impose social distance in response to public health recommendations, their chronic health conditions, and their access to health care.

RESULTS

Risk of exposure to H1N1 was significantly related to race and ethnicity. Spanish-speaking Hispanics were at greatest risk of exposure but were less susceptible to complications from H1N1. Disparities in access to health care remained significant for Spanish-speaking Hispanics after controlling for other demographic factors. We used measures based on prevalence of chronic conditions to determine that Blacks were the most susceptible to complications from H1N1.

CONCLUSIONS

We found significant race/ethnicity-related disparities in potential risk from H1N1 flu. Disparities in the risks of exposure, susceptibility (particularly to severe disease), and access to health care may interact to exacerbate existing health inequalities and contribute to increased morbidity and mortality in these populations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family Science, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, 2242CC SPH Building #255, College Park, MD 20742-2611, USA. scquinn@umd.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21164098

Citation

Quinn, Sandra Crouse, et al. "Racial Disparities in Exposure, Susceptibility, and Access to Health Care in the US H1N1 Influenza Pandemic." American Journal of Public Health, vol. 101, no. 2, 2011, pp. 285-93.
Quinn SC, Kumar S, Freimuth VS, et al. Racial disparities in exposure, susceptibility, and access to health care in the US H1N1 influenza pandemic. Am J Public Health. 2011;101(2):285-93.
Quinn, S. C., Kumar, S., Freimuth, V. S., Musa, D., Casteneda-Angarita, N., & Kidwell, K. (2011). Racial disparities in exposure, susceptibility, and access to health care in the US H1N1 influenza pandemic. American Journal of Public Health, 101(2), 285-93. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2009.188029
Quinn SC, et al. Racial Disparities in Exposure, Susceptibility, and Access to Health Care in the US H1N1 Influenza Pandemic. Am J Public Health. 2011;101(2):285-93. PubMed PMID: 21164098.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Racial disparities in exposure, susceptibility, and access to health care in the US H1N1 influenza pandemic. AU - Quinn,Sandra Crouse, AU - Kumar,Supriya, AU - Freimuth,Vicki S, AU - Musa,Donald, AU - Casteneda-Angarita,Nestor, AU - Kidwell,Kelley, Y1 - 2010/12/16/ PY - 2010/12/18/entrez PY - 2010/12/18/pubmed PY - 2011/2/18/medline SP - 285 EP - 93 JF - American journal of public health JO - Am J Public Health VL - 101 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We conducted the first empirical examination of disparities in H1N1 exposure, susceptibility to H1N1 complications, and access to health care during the H1N1 influenza pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a nationally representative survey among a sample drawn from more than 60,000 US households. We analyzed responses from 1479 adults, including significant numbers of Blacks and Hispanics. The survey asked respondents about their ability to impose social distance in response to public health recommendations, their chronic health conditions, and their access to health care. RESULTS: Risk of exposure to H1N1 was significantly related to race and ethnicity. Spanish-speaking Hispanics were at greatest risk of exposure but were less susceptible to complications from H1N1. Disparities in access to health care remained significant for Spanish-speaking Hispanics after controlling for other demographic factors. We used measures based on prevalence of chronic conditions to determine that Blacks were the most susceptible to complications from H1N1. CONCLUSIONS: We found significant race/ethnicity-related disparities in potential risk from H1N1 flu. Disparities in the risks of exposure, susceptibility (particularly to severe disease), and access to health care may interact to exacerbate existing health inequalities and contribute to increased morbidity and mortality in these populations. SN - 1541-0048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21164098/full_citation L2 - http://www.ajph.org/doi/full/10.2105/AJPH.2009.188029?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -