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Voluntary fluid intake, hydration status, and aerobic performance of adolescent athletes in the heat.
Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2010 Dec; 35(6):834-41.AP

Abstract

We determined whether beverage flavoring and composition would stimulate voluntary drink intake, prevent dehydration, and maintain exercise performance in heat-acclimated adolescent males running in the heat. Eight adolescent (age, 13.7 ± 1.1 years) runners (peak oxygen uptake, 59.5 ± 4.0 mL·kg-1·min-1) underwent at least four 80-min exercise heat-acclimation sessions before completing 3 experimental sessions. All sessions were performed at 30 °C and 60%-65% relative humidity. Each experimental session consisted of five 15-min treadmill runs at a speed eliciting 65% peak oxygen uptake, with a 5 min rest prior to each run. Ten minutes after the final run, a time to exhaustion test was performed at a speed eliciting 90% peak oxygen uptake. Counterbalanced experimental sessions were identical, except for fluid intake, which consisted of tap water (W), flavored water (FW), and FW with 6% carbohydrate and 18 mmol·L-1 NaCl (CNa) consumed ad libitum. Fluid intake and body weight were monitored to calculate dehydration. Voluntary fluid intake was similar to fluid losses in W (1032 ± 130 vs. 1340 ± 246 g), FW (1086 ± 86 vs. 1451 ± 253 g), and CNa (1259 ± 119 vs. 1358 ± 234 g). As a result, significant dehydration was avoided in all trials (-0.45% ± 0.68% body weight in W, -0.66% ± 0.50% body weight in FW, and -0.13% ± 0.71% body weight in CNa). Core temperature increased by ~1 °C during exercise, but was not different between trials. Time to exhaustion was not different between trials and averaged 8.8 ± 1.7 min. Under exercise conditions more closely reflecting real-life situations, heat-acclimatized adolescent male runners can appropriately gauge fluid intake regardless of the type of beverage made available, resulting in consistency in exercise performance.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Children's Exercise and Nutrition Centre, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21164555

Citation

Wilk, Boguslaw, et al. "Voluntary Fluid Intake, Hydration Status, and Aerobic Performance of Adolescent Athletes in the Heat." Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism = Physiologie Appliquee, Nutrition Et Metabolisme, vol. 35, no. 6, 2010, pp. 834-41.
Wilk B, Timmons BW, Bar-Or O. Voluntary fluid intake, hydration status, and aerobic performance of adolescent athletes in the heat. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2010;35(6):834-41.
Wilk, B., Timmons, B. W., & Bar-Or, O. (2010). Voluntary fluid intake, hydration status, and aerobic performance of adolescent athletes in the heat. Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism = Physiologie Appliquee, Nutrition Et Metabolisme, 35(6), 834-41. https://doi.org/10.1139/H10-084
Wilk B, Timmons BW, Bar-Or O. Voluntary Fluid Intake, Hydration Status, and Aerobic Performance of Adolescent Athletes in the Heat. Appl Physiol Nutr Metab. 2010;35(6):834-41. PubMed PMID: 21164555.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Voluntary fluid intake, hydration status, and aerobic performance of adolescent athletes in the heat. AU - Wilk,Boguslaw, AU - Timmons,Brian W, AU - Bar-Or,Oded, PY - 2010/12/18/entrez PY - 2010/12/18/pubmed PY - 2011/3/16/medline SP - 834 EP - 41 JF - Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme JO - Appl Physiol Nutr Metab VL - 35 IS - 6 N2 - We determined whether beverage flavoring and composition would stimulate voluntary drink intake, prevent dehydration, and maintain exercise performance in heat-acclimated adolescent males running in the heat. Eight adolescent (age, 13.7 ± 1.1 years) runners (peak oxygen uptake, 59.5 ± 4.0 mL·kg-1·min-1) underwent at least four 80-min exercise heat-acclimation sessions before completing 3 experimental sessions. All sessions were performed at 30 °C and 60%-65% relative humidity. Each experimental session consisted of five 15-min treadmill runs at a speed eliciting 65% peak oxygen uptake, with a 5 min rest prior to each run. Ten minutes after the final run, a time to exhaustion test was performed at a speed eliciting 90% peak oxygen uptake. Counterbalanced experimental sessions were identical, except for fluid intake, which consisted of tap water (W), flavored water (FW), and FW with 6% carbohydrate and 18 mmol·L-1 NaCl (CNa) consumed ad libitum. Fluid intake and body weight were monitored to calculate dehydration. Voluntary fluid intake was similar to fluid losses in W (1032 ± 130 vs. 1340 ± 246 g), FW (1086 ± 86 vs. 1451 ± 253 g), and CNa (1259 ± 119 vs. 1358 ± 234 g). As a result, significant dehydration was avoided in all trials (-0.45% ± 0.68% body weight in W, -0.66% ± 0.50% body weight in FW, and -0.13% ± 0.71% body weight in CNa). Core temperature increased by ~1 °C during exercise, but was not different between trials. Time to exhaustion was not different between trials and averaged 8.8 ± 1.7 min. Under exercise conditions more closely reflecting real-life situations, heat-acclimatized adolescent male runners can appropriately gauge fluid intake regardless of the type of beverage made available, resulting in consistency in exercise performance. SN - 1715-5312 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21164555/Voluntary_fluid_intake_hydration_status_and_aerobic_performance_of_adolescent_athletes_in_the_heat_ L2 - http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/full/10.1139/H10-084?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -