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Adherence to a Mediterranean-type dietary pattern and cognitive decline in a community population.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2011 Mar; 93(3):601-7.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Many of the foods abundant in the traditional Mediterranean diet, such as vegetables and fish, have been associated with slower cognitive decline.

OBJECTIVE

We investigated whether adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern or to the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005) is associated with cognitive change in older adults.

DESIGN

This article is based on analyses of data from an ongoing longitudinal study in adults aged ≥65 y known as the Chicago Health and Aging Project (CHAP). CHAP participants (2280 blacks and 1510 whites) with ≥2 cognitive assessments were evaluated for adherence to 1) the Mediterranean dietary pattern (MedDiet; maximum score: 55) and 2) the HEI-2005 (maximum score: 100). For both scoring systems, higher scores connote greater adherence. Cognitive function was assessed at 3-y intervals on the basis of a composite measure of global cognition. Linear mixed models were used to examine the association of dietary scores to change in cognitive function. Mean follow-up time was 7.6 y.

RESULTS

Mean (±SD) scores for participants were 28.2 ± 0.1 for the MedDiet and 61.2 ± 9.6 for the HEI-2005. White participants had higher energy-adjusted MedDiet scores but lower HEI-2005 scores than did black participants. Higher MedDiet scores were associated with slower rates of cognitive decline (β = +0.0014 per 1-point increase, SEE = 0.0004, P = 0.0004) after adjustment for age, sex, race, education, participation in cognitive activities, and energy. No such associations were observed for HEI-2005 scores.

CONCLUSION

The Mediterranean dietary pattern as captured by the MedDiet scoring system may reduce the rate of cognitive decline with older age.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Nutrition, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA. ctangney@rush.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21177796

Citation

Tangney, Christine C., et al. "Adherence to a Mediterranean-type Dietary Pattern and Cognitive Decline in a Community Population." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 93, no. 3, 2011, pp. 601-7.
Tangney CC, Kwasny MJ, Li H, et al. Adherence to a Mediterranean-type dietary pattern and cognitive decline in a community population. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;93(3):601-7.
Tangney, C. C., Kwasny, M. J., Li, H., Wilson, R. S., Evans, D. A., & Morris, M. C. (2011). Adherence to a Mediterranean-type dietary pattern and cognitive decline in a community population. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 93(3), 601-7. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.110.007369
Tangney CC, et al. Adherence to a Mediterranean-type Dietary Pattern and Cognitive Decline in a Community Population. Am J Clin Nutr. 2011;93(3):601-7. PubMed PMID: 21177796.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adherence to a Mediterranean-type dietary pattern and cognitive decline in a community population. AU - Tangney,Christine C, AU - Kwasny,Mary J, AU - Li,Hong, AU - Wilson,Robert S, AU - Evans,Denis A, AU - Morris,Martha Clare, Y1 - 2010/12/22/ PY - 2010/12/24/entrez PY - 2010/12/24/pubmed PY - 2011/4/13/medline SP - 601 EP - 7 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 93 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Many of the foods abundant in the traditional Mediterranean diet, such as vegetables and fish, have been associated with slower cognitive decline. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether adherence to a Mediterranean dietary pattern or to the Healthy Eating Index-2005 (HEI-2005) is associated with cognitive change in older adults. DESIGN: This article is based on analyses of data from an ongoing longitudinal study in adults aged ≥65 y known as the Chicago Health and Aging Project (CHAP). CHAP participants (2280 blacks and 1510 whites) with ≥2 cognitive assessments were evaluated for adherence to 1) the Mediterranean dietary pattern (MedDiet; maximum score: 55) and 2) the HEI-2005 (maximum score: 100). For both scoring systems, higher scores connote greater adherence. Cognitive function was assessed at 3-y intervals on the basis of a composite measure of global cognition. Linear mixed models were used to examine the association of dietary scores to change in cognitive function. Mean follow-up time was 7.6 y. RESULTS: Mean (±SD) scores for participants were 28.2 ± 0.1 for the MedDiet and 61.2 ± 9.6 for the HEI-2005. White participants had higher energy-adjusted MedDiet scores but lower HEI-2005 scores than did black participants. Higher MedDiet scores were associated with slower rates of cognitive decline (β = +0.0014 per 1-point increase, SEE = 0.0004, P = 0.0004) after adjustment for age, sex, race, education, participation in cognitive activities, and energy. No such associations were observed for HEI-2005 scores. CONCLUSION: The Mediterranean dietary pattern as captured by the MedDiet scoring system may reduce the rate of cognitive decline with older age. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21177796/Adherence_to_a_Mediterranean_type_dietary_pattern_and_cognitive_decline_in_a_community_population_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.110.007369 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -