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Dietary supplement use in the United States, 2003-2006.
J Nutr 2011; 141(2):261-6JN

Abstract

Dietary supplement use has steadily increased over time since the 1970s; however, no current data exist for the U.S. population. Therefore, the purpose of this analysis was to estimate dietary supplement use using the NHANES 2003-2006, a nationally representative, cross-sectional survey. Dietary supplement use was analyzed for the U.S. population (≥1 y of age) by the DRI age groupings. Supplement use was measured through a questionnaire and was reported by 49% of the U.S. population (44% of males, 53% of females). Multivitamin-multimineral use was the most frequently reported dietary supplement (33%). The majority of people reported taking only 1 dietary supplement and did so on a daily basis. Dietary supplement use was lowest in obese adults and highest among non-Hispanic whites, older adults, and those with more than a high-school education. Between 28 and 30% reported using dietary supplements containing vitamins B-6, B-12, C, A, and E; 18-19% reported using iron, selenium, and chromium; and 26-27% reported using zinc- and magnesium-containing supplements. Botanical supplement use was more common in older than in younger age groups and was lowest in those aged 1-13 y but was reported by ~20% of adults. About one-half of the U.S. population and 70% of adults ≥ 71 y use dietary supplements; one-third use multivitamin-multimineral dietary supplements. Given the widespread use of supplements, data should be included with nutrient intakes from foods to correctly determine total nutrient exposure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements, Bethesda, MD 20892-7517, USA. baileyr@mail.nih.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

21178089

Citation

Bailey, Regan L., et al. "Dietary Supplement Use in the United States, 2003-2006." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 141, no. 2, 2011, pp. 261-6.
Bailey RL, Gahche JJ, Lentino CV, et al. Dietary supplement use in the United States, 2003-2006. J Nutr. 2011;141(2):261-6.
Bailey, R. L., Gahche, J. J., Lentino, C. V., Dwyer, J. T., Engel, J. S., Thomas, P. R., ... Picciano, M. F. (2011). Dietary supplement use in the United States, 2003-2006. The Journal of Nutrition, 141(2), pp. 261-6. doi:10.3945/jn.110.133025.
Bailey RL, et al. Dietary Supplement Use in the United States, 2003-2006. J Nutr. 2011;141(2):261-6. PubMed PMID: 21178089.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary supplement use in the United States, 2003-2006. AU - Bailey,Regan L, AU - Gahche,Jaime J, AU - Lentino,Cindy V, AU - Dwyer,Johanna T, AU - Engel,Jody S, AU - Thomas,Paul R, AU - Betz,Joseph M, AU - Sempos,Christopher T, AU - Picciano,Mary Frances, Y1 - 2010/12/22/ PY - 2010/12/24/entrez PY - 2010/12/24/pubmed PY - 2011/2/24/medline SP - 261 EP - 6 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 141 IS - 2 N2 - Dietary supplement use has steadily increased over time since the 1970s; however, no current data exist for the U.S. population. Therefore, the purpose of this analysis was to estimate dietary supplement use using the NHANES 2003-2006, a nationally representative, cross-sectional survey. Dietary supplement use was analyzed for the U.S. population (≥1 y of age) by the DRI age groupings. Supplement use was measured through a questionnaire and was reported by 49% of the U.S. population (44% of males, 53% of females). Multivitamin-multimineral use was the most frequently reported dietary supplement (33%). The majority of people reported taking only 1 dietary supplement and did so on a daily basis. Dietary supplement use was lowest in obese adults and highest among non-Hispanic whites, older adults, and those with more than a high-school education. Between 28 and 30% reported using dietary supplements containing vitamins B-6, B-12, C, A, and E; 18-19% reported using iron, selenium, and chromium; and 26-27% reported using zinc- and magnesium-containing supplements. Botanical supplement use was more common in older than in younger age groups and was lowest in those aged 1-13 y but was reported by ~20% of adults. About one-half of the U.S. population and 70% of adults ≥ 71 y use dietary supplements; one-third use multivitamin-multimineral dietary supplements. Given the widespread use of supplements, data should be included with nutrient intakes from foods to correctly determine total nutrient exposure. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/21178089/Dietary_supplement_use_in_the_United_States_2003_2006_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/jn.110.133025 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -